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Has anyone heard of this? As explained to me by my father (still beekeeping in Ireland) who learned it from his grandfather.
Having the frames parallel to the entrance (current langstroths are perpendicular) with the frame closest to the entrance being 3 inches shorter than the others. The reason being that the bees draw out drone comb there. Queen lays drone there. The drones are at then at entrance and protect the hive from intruders.
Could this work or is it just folklore? Might be worth a try for those trying the square hives. By the way this is how my dad still advocates beekeeping today.
 

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Folklore. Drones do nothing to defend the hive (and in fact have no stings, so they couldn't even if they were inclined). And in the drone comb, that is, as pupae, they can do even less than nothing! It would take a hatched-out, mature adult to move to attack a defender; the comb from which she originated makes zero difference. I'm afraid this one's twice a "momily".
 

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Sometimes things happen for the wrong reason. Maybe the location of the drones make them a sacrificial lamb for mites outside of the normal brood area.
 

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Sometimes things happen for the wrong reason. Maybe the location of the drones make them a sacrificial lamb for mites outside of the normal brood area.
I was thinking the same thing. A local beek here throws a medium frame in his deeps. The bees build drone comb off the bottom and he uses drone removal as part of his mite managment practices.

Mike
 

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It is my understanding that comb orientation being across the entrance is for a difference in airflow. If we looked at the orientation of comb in bee trees, what would we see?
 

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I also use drone trapping as part of my IPM regimen. The position of the comb, however, doesn't affect whether mites would use it. Drone comb that gets laid up, wherever it is in the colony, will attract the mites.

And Mark you're right on the airflow thing; warm-way (comb parallel to entrance, blocking breezes) and cold-way (perpendicular to entrance) are terms often used.
 

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They add on a top ventilation type box, but the D.E. hive from beeworks is exactly this. Hive rotated 90 degrees on a modified bottom board that gives the entrance on what we would normally call the side. Thought about it, but never tried it. It'd take up more room on my stand that way :pinch: but is probably worth a try to find if it works out better in my location. Don't think I'd be buying a kit, just moding a bottom board.
 
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