Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
760 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ive been thinking of this question for some time and have yet to have it answered

What happens in the wild when a hive out lives the tree they live in??

meaning if the hive is in a cavity that is say.....20 feet up in the tree and the tree falls over ..... Now the hive is 20 feet lower and 20 feet in what ever direction it fell in.

so so the bees still go to mid air and hang out or do they find home down on the ground?


on that note
and this leads somewhere .....trust me

now that the hive is on the ground the thing that comes to mind is the CELLS

they are at an upwards angle to the earths gravity - to hold the larva and honey

BUT now that the tree is on its side the comb is now 90 degress off

how do the bees fix this???

now to where all this leads to

when you do a cut out ''' HOW important is it to get the brood in the upright position ???""""


the best 30 answers will be taken !!! haha but really think about it cause it does make one wonder about it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
all the ones I have seen, have packed up and moved when the tree fell, so I don't know about that.
I have put capped brood in willy=nilly, but if I try to save the uncapped I try to have it right side up.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,668 Posts
I know an Amish guy that cuts timber. He cut down a bee tree and hauled it home, and had it laying on its side. A year later I helped him do a cutout. The bees had simply moved down the cavity and drawn new combs. They had abandoned their original combs.

when you do a cut out ''' HOW important is it to get the brood in the upright position ???

Seeing as how it is very easy to tell which way is the proper orientation, I think the question is how lazy the person doing the cutout is. Then again, if they were too lazy to pay attention to the top and bottom of comb sections, it is likely they are too lazy to be doing a cutout in the first place.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top