Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'd been very curious about figuring out how the drifter bees work, and also just what makes the bees decide how they do things. You all are also curious about this to some degree, I think.

Anyway, one of the things I'd noticed is that during the night a lot of bees hang out overnight at the feeders. Its not a ton but its at least a few dozen. And it made me very curious. Every day its the same. Dozens of bees will be sleeping at night at the sugar water feeder, and or sometimes a smaller number at the water (only water) feeder.

I'd been quite puzzled by this behavior. Its natural the drifters would want to stay where the food is at. That's survival instinct.

But it also has me curious if they are there to follow other bees back to their colonies, either as not really drifters, or as drifters? (probably less chance for them to do it as not really being drifters, but hey there's a smaller chance right... )

Anyway its interesting to me because very few people get to see this and bring it up. I feed the bees at night before sunup. That's why I get to see this all the time and have spotted it. But I know that not many other people would feed the bees before sunup. So they wouldn't have the chance to see stuff like this. So its fun to bring up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,116 Posts
Not all bees return to the hive before dark. I don’t think these bees are “drifting” or homeless. Generally, they will return to their own hives the next day. This becomes evident when you move bee hives around a good bit. I generally move them at night. I will usually find a few dozen bees that have returned the next day sitting where their hive had been.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Have noticed in spring that some honeybees overnight on tulip poplar leaves. Seems to be some sap oozing that they dont like to leave. Noticed same behavior with immature Bumble Bees.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top