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One of my hive died.
Some bees have tails sticking out the cells. There was plenty of sugar up above or at other combs, why didn't they go there?

Also, there are these small crystals looking like things, that are maybe 1/16 in diameter. What is that?
see picture for reference
 

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The white crystalin stuff is most likely Varroa mite poop which indicates the bees were overwhelmed by Varroa. In winter the bees cannot travel away from the cluster to obtain food (honey), even though it is very close by. The bees were probably so weakened by the Varroa and the cluster so small that it could not generate/maintain the minimum amount of heat for life, and could not obtain food for subsistence that is just died.

If you get bees again in 2019, feed them excessively so that the colony grows strong, inspect for and treat for Varroa mites, inspect periodically, and be sure they have a good food supply in the fall.

Steve
 

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What Steve said sums it up as well as can be diagnosed from this vantage point. If I remember correctly, you had a varroa issue in your earlier posts so this is likely the cause. Next season is just around the corner really, so decide how you want to manage them during the cold winter months by reading some good books and posts here. J
 

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I might add that you said that there was sugar available. No honey? Honey stored as the bees will naturally be more available to convert to the energy they need to survive in cold weather. Sugar is a poor substitute. As an emergency measure it might be enough to keep them alive but without any honey, will almost as likely fail. .
 

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Sugar or honey will feed the bees but they need to be in contact with it. They were clustered - bees still in the cells are evidence of this - it was too cold for the cluster for break and move to the food so they starved. The crystals in the cells below the cluster are mite poo, evidence of weakened bees.
 

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I might add that you said that there was sugar available. No honey? Honey stored as the bees will naturally be more available to convert to the energy they need to survive in cold weather. Sugar is a poor substitute. As an emergency measure it might be enough to keep them alive but without any honey, will almost as likely fail. .
Ehmm.
Sugar piles or candy boards have helped keep my bees alive through cold wet snowy windy winters over the years when there was no other stores
in the hive
or the only other stores were cured sugar water in the comb.
I find sugar to be a good substitute, not a poor one.
Furthermore, pollen sub will get them through the first rounds of spring brood if the colony lacks pollen come late winter. Of course, they
abandon the sub as soon as they can collect natural pollen.

Cluster size and healthy bees seems to be more a factor than type of food stored.
 

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Ehmm.
or the only other stores were cured sugar water in the comb.

As far as I’m concerned ‘cured sugar water’ in the comb is honey. Not for sale as honey but to be consumed by bees.

As I said, stored honey…regardless of whether it is from nectar or sugar syrup…… is more available to convert to energy during cold weather. Dry sugar alone is a poor substitute.
Do it however you want….they’re your bees.
 

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As far as I’m concerned ‘cured sugar water’ in the comb is honey. Not for sale as honey but to be consumed by bees.

As I said, stored honey…regardless of whether it is from nectar or sugar syrup…… is more available to convert to energy during cold weather. Dry sugar alone is a poor substitute.
Do it however you want….they’re your bees.
You're saying it now.
I still don't agree! So be it.

But Yeah, my bees my ways. Thanks.
 
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