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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend sent me this link: http://www.jarrettmellenbruch.com/haven/

I thought it was cool for about 1/2 second. After he builds one of these bee death traps on a pole, does he come back with a bucket lift and work the hive all year round? I guess the "save the bees art aficionados" types are going to pay a couple of thousand dollars for one of these and work it themselves.
 

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I own that very same lift.
Kind of cool - he's got them up where nobody's gonna mess with them in such public places.
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Why is it a bee death trap?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's an art installation, not meant to be practical as a bee hive.

They are working bee hive sculptures, according to this article. He says that he plans to build a network of 1000 "bee havens" that are the perfect home for bees. If he really wants to help the bees, why doesn't he put them in hives that can be worked?



http://kcur.org/post/artist-creates-haven-honeybees
 

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There is also a group in the Netherlands called the sky hive collective. They do have some workable designs....up in the air is a good place for bees In an urban or populated setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It seems about as cruel and inhumane....as a bee tree.
I wonder if he tells the supporting patrons that the colony has virtually no chance of survival? Of course he places them so high up on a pole that nobody would be able to tell otherwise. Something about the "optimum height and conditions":

"His design matches what we know makes for a prime home site for honeybees: height off the ground, entrance size, cavity size, entrance direction. All of those things.


The hive is bolted to the bottom board and doesn't look workable (one solid piece?) even with a cherry picker.



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I wonder if he tells the supporting patrons that the colony has virtually no chance of survival? Of course he places them so high up on a pole that nobody would be able to tell otherwise. Something about the "optimum height and conditions":

"His design matches what we know makes for a prime home site for honeybees: height off the ground, entrance size, cavity size, entrance direction. All of those things.


The hive is bolted to the bottom board and doesn't look workable (one solid piece?) even with a cherry picker.



View attachment 12419
Being "workable" and being able to survive winter are two separate issues. Who gives a tinker's darn if they are workable? There are bee trees and between-the-rafters hives all over the place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Being "workable" and being able to survive winter are two separate issues. Who gives a tinker's darn if they are workable? There are bee trees and between-the-rafters hives all over the place.
So it is OK to put bees in a box and then completely ignore them; all the time claiming that you are helping the bees? Why not just leave them alone?
 

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According to New York state apiary laws, it's not ok.

7. Persons keeping bees shall keep them in hives of such
construction that the frames and combs may be easily
removed without damaging them for examination of the brood
for the purpose of determining whether disease exists in the
brood.
http://www.eshpa.org/index.php/ny-apiary-laws
 

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When he said "death trap" I assumed he meant for the guy who goes up in that cherry picker to check on the hive.
I thought the same thing. While for the most part my girls are gentle, they still have their moments that have left me skeddaling to get away really quick when they took offense.
Not much place to "get away' up there is there???
 

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So it is OK to put bees in a box and then completely ignore them; all the time claiming that you are helping the bees?
He has a lift. Who says he's not working them?
That lift takes seven minutes to set up and get to that level.
 

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"Kansas City artist and third-generation
beekeeper
Jarrett Mellenbruch wants to do
his part to save the honeybees, which are
under stress from colony collapse disorder
and other ailments.

On Friday, from 6-8 p.m., Mellenbruch will
unveil a working beehive sculpture on a 16- ! !
foot post in the 18Broadway gardens at the southeast corner of Broadway and
18th Street.
Titled “Haven,” the durable Corian sculpture marks the first step in a planned
nationwide honeybee sanctuary project, the artist says.
The beehive sculpture was made possible by an Andy Warhol Foundation Rocket
Grant, administered by Charlotte Street Foundation in Kansas City and KU’s
Spencer Museum of Art. DST Systems developed the garden as a sustainable
development demonstration project.
The dedication will feature foods dependent on honeybee pollination, including
apples, blueberries, walnuts, almonds, beets and broccoli. And, the honey in this
hive will stay with the bees."
 

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Maybe he has no plans to work the hives.....

Health of the Hive
By Elyse Mallouk
February 29, 2012
Good stories take ordinary experiences and make them ecstatic and unfamiliar. They are products of imagination, the creators of new images despite everything seeable already existing.1 Though often considered an individual attribute, imagination is also collaborative, activated and verified by other people. The production of something mysterious relies on someone else to experience it as such. It hinges not only on another person’s ability to recognize a pattern in a set of signs, but also to invent new meaning. If imagination is a dependent capability, protecting the imaginations of others is a vital part of caring for oneself.

Warm in Winter

In 2007, I started to notice honeybees wobbling on my back stoop, disoriented and drained, uninterested in flowers. One would turn up every couple of weeks, stumbling in circles on the cement. I thought it might be a phenomenon unique to the microclimate just south of San Francisco’s Alamo Square Park; the clouds always broke over the hill, creating a warm patch of sky above the back door. Around the same time, worker bees all over the country were abandoning their hives, ignoring the flowers.

The first Haven (2011) hive sits atop a sixteen-foot-tall steel post anchored in a public park in Kansas City, Missouri. Jarett Mellenbruch undertook research to find a structure that would appeal to wild bees, one large enough to house a swarm but small enough to ensure that the bees would keep each other warm in winter. Three years later, he arrived at a box built from high-density polyethylene and wood, insulated like a hollow tree branch. His aim for Haven, which currently exists largely as a proposal, is to install one thousand of these elevated spaces in urban areas across the United States, challenging colony collapse and habitat loss by providing wild pollinators with new homes. In addition to making feral colonies available for study, the project also helps bees with their public relations. Mellenbruch’s structure looks like a birdhouse with an open gable roof, its white Corian exterior carved with false colonnades. A placard near the hive provides information about the bees, aping literature found in zoos and national parks. Quick Response (QR) codes on the plaques will link to more detail and to a page where visitors can offer up their observations of the hive.

When their hives get too crowded, bees relocate by sending out scouts. They collect information about a knot in a tree or a hole in a wall and return to convey this to the rest, wiggling a map that spells out where to find the site in relation to the sun. The intensity of a bee’s vibrations connotes its level of excitement, and each scout makes a case. Haven encourages this existing process by giving wild bees ideal places to dance about. It also uses the swarm as a metaphor for human activity; when enough hives are installed and the QR codes are in place, the project will create a network of amateur and expert beekeepers, park visitors, and ecologists. The project crowdsources on the bees’ behalf, mirroring the way they distribute responsibility to collect information. Years from now, the individual data points will accumulate into a narrative about wild pollinators, making it easier to monitor the health of the hive.
 

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Re: Maybe he has no plans to work the hives.....

I would love to hear the conversation between him and the bee inspector. Art guy, "I forgot my lift, :ws:."
Bee inspector "No worries, I have an axe."
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
"Kansas City artist and third-generation
beekeeper
Jarrett Mellenbruch wants to do
his part to save the honeybees, which are
under stress from colony collapse disorder
and other ailments.
That's even worse. Shouldn't a third generation beekeeper know that putting bees in a box and leaving them unintended is not doing one's part to "save the honeybees".

He has a lift. Who says he's not working them?
That lift takes seven minutes to set up and get to that level.

From another article: "...the artist has hopes that, with the help of a corporate sponsor or a grant, he’ll be able to meet his goal of a network of 1000 Haven hives.". That's a lot of hives for a full-time artist to be tending. Is he going to hire the work out?


Plus the "sculptures" are made of Corian and I dont see any weights holding down the lids; looks like a 1-piece construction. There is a lot of wind in Kansas City at 30 feet up in the air. I dont even think that a 5-gallon bucket of water would do the trick in this case.
 
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