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Long Langstroth Deep
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have built a long langstroth deep hive box.
I was toying with the various frame choices and philosophies.
I agree with a lot of the ideas behind the foundationless frames
And I think since they are deep frames I will add a wire horizontally across the half way down point.( to help keep them from sagging or falling out as easy)
That being said while starting out I had a swarm come into an open shed and get in some plywood leaned against a wall.
As I was not ready with any equipment I allowed them to stay where they were for a time.
About five days ago my father decided they needed to go and pulled the plywood down piece by piece until the hive was exposed.
I have the box built and now need my frames which I guess I will order some assembled ones and add a guide on underside of top bar.
Now my question is yesterday the bees have vacated the hive except a very few hanging around.
So for now I am left with bee drawn comb attached to the plywood. Some on each end of hive is clean and some towards the middle is of course well used!
And was wondering if I could cut or pull off the comb and band in into some of the frames?

Should I freeze it first to kill off parasites?

Since it was on the back of plywood standing up it is approx 4 1/2” wide and 16 “ long and was initially oriented long side vertical.
Should I cut to length to fit in frame along one end vertically?
Or can I cut it to length to band under top bar and lay it down from original orientation?
What are your thoughts?

Thank You for any help and info.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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in general the comb has a 15 degree upward slope to help hold contents, One would need to keep the comb in the Same orientation. Ideally if you put it in frames you also put it in a hive to keep it getting attached ,as in time comb gets brittle.
You could use the best and biggest to make a swarm trap with as it is "bee smelling"

Likely it has little value, but give it a try you never know.

GG
 

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Long Langstroth Deep
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Grey Goose,

Yes I figured there was a slight tilt upwards to hives to maintain them easier.
So if the comb gets brittle over time does this mean that Beekeeper swap out older frames of comb periodically to maintain a more fresh (less brittle) comb supply?
 

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Thanks Grey Goose,

Yes I figured there was a slight tilt upwards to hives to maintain them easier.
So if the comb gets brittle over time does this mean that Beekeeper swap out older frames of comb periodically to maintain a more fresh (less brittle) comb supply?
Comb becomes brittle IF unused.
On the opposite, IF the comb get routine use (especially the brooding use) it only gets more reinforced (to the point where you can stand on black combs after several years of use).

The need of the comb removal has to do with potential accumulation of pollutants and germs in it (not the brittleness).

As far as the tilt - you do best you can.
When trying to fit cut-out combs into the frames, you often need to make less than ideal decisions.
As long as the tilt is not negative (about zero is still fine) - this is a non-issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Greg V
What about freezing to rid parasites first?
64720
 

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What about freezing to rid parasites first?
Not necessary.
OK, IF you have time/desire/freezer space - sure.
It will not hurt and will kill off moth/beettles (but not any significant parasites IF they are even present which I doubt very much).
 

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Thanks Grey Goose,

Yes I figured there was a slight tilt upwards to hives to maintain them easier.
So if the comb gets brittle over time does this mean that Beekeeper swap out older frames of comb periodically to maintain a more fresh (less brittle) comb supply?
no not needed.
It dries out some how, the bees make it well again, I have used old comb in supers just fine.
I was only stating this to advise that cutting it out and banding it in frames would over time get neer impossible.

we do swap out comb as it ages (5 to 8 years) for contamination reasons.

GG
 
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