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Unfortunately the answer is no to both questions.
This is why this thread is so long and people are discussing so many aspects to creating these devices.
The controller is actually not that hard to wire up.
The challenging part, at least for me, was creating the bowl and nozzle.
Then the next challenging part is just getting all of the right sizes of various things and making everything come together correctly. I have several wrong size band heaters sitting around and several wrong size cook pot/bowls as well. Wrong size is maybe not the right way to think about it. Lets say they were all part of my learning mode experiments.

So it is not really a "plug and play" type of project.
It was definitely “humble beginnings“ for me to learn how to make cook pots. I had never brazed or welded before and most of my building experience is with wood. Below are 20+ of my unsuccessful attempts when I was still learning. To make things even more difficult I was experimenting with all kinds of different designs. The first ones I made make me laugh out loud at myself and hopefully can give a few of you a laugh as well ;) Finally I asked a friend for guidance on how to braze and presto - they are pretty easy once I learned the correct process.

C991C8B8-5BAC-4D6E-982B-CE490A3B8C79.jpeg
 

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Try that for 500 or 1,000 plugs.

I did make a 2x4 with 6 holes for the plugs to nicely, but tightly fit in and drilled them quickly with the Forstner bit.

We use 1 1/4" pipe K-type pipe, not couplers. We cut the whole 10' to length on our cold cut saw, clean the ends and weld the punched lids from K-type copper stock on the bottom.

The Mocap1.187/1.437 HOLLOW SILICONE PLUG, RED-OXIDE plug only holds 2 gram.

The HUP7.5-04 #7.5 fits nicely and it holds 3 gram, plus. I use 3gram.
 

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Try that for 500 or 1,000 plugs.

I did make a 2x4 with 6 holes for the plugs to nicely, but tightly fit in and drilled them quickly with the Forstner bit.

We use 1 1/4" pipe K-type pipe, not couplers. We cut the whole 10' to length on our cold cut saw, clean the ends and weld the punched lids from K-type copper stock on the bottom.

The Mocap1.187/1.437 HOLLOW SILICONE PLUG, RED-OXIDE plug only holds 2 gram.

The HUP7.5-04 #7.5 fits nicely and it holds 3 gram, plus. I use 3gram.
Using 10’ pipe certainly seems more cost effective;) Do you find the OA collects less on the inside of the Hup7.5-04 cap? Thanks.
 

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@Jbee6000 Interesting.

So are beekeepers making separate bowls that get neatly tucked down into the band heater?

Or are they just welding some copper directly to the bottom of the band heater?
 

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@Jbee6000 Interesting.

So are beekeepers making separate bowls that get neatly tucked down into the band heater?

Or are they just welding some copper directly to the bottom of the band heater?
Hi 00101, I believe everyone that makes vaporizers that use band heaters as the heating element are making copper vessels that are heated by the band heater. Band heaters are typically used in the plastic injection molding industry from my understanding and they are used to heat the nozzles. I’ve never seen anyone try to make a vessel out of the band heater itself.
 

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@Jbee6000 Interesting.

So are beekeepers making separate bowls that get neatly tucked down into the band heater?

Or are they just welding some copper directly to the bottom of the band heater?
The band heaters don't have a bottom. They are a "band" that is clamped around the cook bowl with a sort of hose clamp.

It might be best if you were to read through the thread. Then you would have a better basis for your questions.
 

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It was definitely “humble beginnings“ for me to learn how to make cook pots. I had never brazed or welded before and most of my building experience is with wood. Below are 20+ of my unsuccessful attempts when I was still learning. To make things even more difficult I was experimenting with all kinds of different designs. The first ones I made make me laugh out loud at myself and hopefully can give a few of you a laugh as well ;) Finally I asked a friend for guidance on how to braze and presto - they are pretty easy once I learned the correct process.

View attachment 62063
That's Great!
You Should mount them like that and make a display out of them!
 

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Wow! This thread is the reason I found this forum and signed up (via google and Reddit). I'm a tinkerer and looking to make an OAVap. Looks like all the information can be had with some careful reading here but before I do that is there a tutorial/parts list already somewhere I should know about?
 

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Johno has indicated that he is going to be putting together a tutorial and current parts list. It has been an evolving process for all the folks that are making them.
 

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How much oxalic acid is everyone planning to use for their plugs? Just asking because I watched a recent video where some commercial beekeepers were agreeing that a double dose works better than the single dose.
( long video but start at about 32:30 - 36:00 )

So that's 4 grams.

I'm new to the thread. I was hoping to build my own, but this thread has convinced me that it would take ME 50+ hours of tinkering and I would probably end up with junk. When you think of it that way, the $500 doesn't sound too bad. OK, it's always bad to get gouged. But I'm a youtube plumber and electrician only. I'm pretty much lost without actually seeing someone do it. ... not even going to mention my lack of welding skills.

You guys have done an amazing job, but I don't want to feel your pain.

I'll probably buy one this summer, when it's time to make splits ... but crossing my fingers that a precise parts list (with links and instructions and a video not requiring a 3D printer) magically appears before then. I can dream can't I?
 

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I use 3 gram on a double deep. 2 gram on a single and it has worked good for me. Important is how your applicator works, 'puffs' the stuff intro the hive, inside/outside temperature etc. I don't like to go below 10°C (50°F).
 

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Okay, here my DIY help:

DIY AC Oxalic Acid Vaporizer

Varroa Decimator

Joerg Klempnauer, 20-2-2020​



Many options are thinkable and not one design is binding. The result makes the design good or bad.

Notice to reader: You are going to work with electricity, so ground well and work carfully! Stay safe!

The plan is to vaporize the OA, so the temperature needs to be around 380-420°F (194-215°C). Consider a bowl material with good heat conductivity and good strength. My preference is 1 ¼” copper K-type heating pipe, sold in 10’ length. 3/16” copper tube for the vaporizing tube, this (as much as I have found) only comes in coiled form and is initially very soft, but hardens during the first 20 uses.

Let’s try to get a list together for main components needed to build 120 VAC Oxalic Acid Vaporizer. I will start at the extension cable.
  • Connecting cable, 10 Amp, 10 to 15’ long, bendable at colder temperatures. Grounded = three prong, 18 AWG
  • Optional: switch with LED light that comes on when power is applied to the heating coil (Gardner Bender GSW-42)
  • PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) controller (MYPIN TA4-RNR or INKBIRD ITC-106RH)
  • Heat Element (PPE MX13705 – 120VAC 300 Watt) this fits around the 1 ¼” copper pipe
  • Someone to weld a cap from copper to one side of a piece of pipe cut 2 ¾”
  • The 3/16” vaporizing pipe can be made in many ways, straight out the bottom, bottom side, or anywhere up to 1” from the top
  • Someone to weld the 3/16” copper to the bowl
  • One or two holes in the bottom to mount the bowl to a frame
  • K-type temperature probe with ¼” ring end
  • Aluminum flat bar, ¼” by 1.5”, 8-10” long(?)
  • Box to house the controls – remember you will be heating the bowl and heat will eventually travel along the alu bar to your controls and hands holding this thing!
  • 1 or 2 stainless ¼” bolts and acorn nuts to mount the bowl to the alu bar - hint: put the nuts from the inside!
  • 2 or 4 small washers to raise the bowl off the bar to reduce heat travel
Silicon type plug with cavity for the OA charge of 2-4 gram (check CAPlugs.com – I use SH-33533 HUP7.5-04 #7.5 ULTRABAKE

Below a wiring diagram for the MYPIN.

110.04 Wiring.png
 

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Band heater vaporizers have attracted a lot of recent attention on the Beekeeping Facebook group I administer. One merchant has been especially energetic in promoting his branded device. In the interest of fairness, I would like to collect names and details of the other start-ups offering their devices. PM with details and links so I can aggregate all the options.
 

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Okay, here my DIY help:

Joerg Klempnauer, 20-2-2020​

  • PID (Proportional, Integral, and Derivative) controller (MYPIN TA4-RNR or INKBIRD ITC-106RH)
  • The 3/16” vaporizing pipe can be made in many ways, straight out the bottom, bottom side, or anywhere up to 1” from the top
Thanks! Great info Joerg - I've a question on the 3/16 pipe. Is that the O.D. or the I.D.? I have 1/8" and 1/4" copper thick wall pipe readily available.........

On that note: Is there any particular reason so many people put the bend in it adding length when most I've read say to keep the length to 2" or less for cooling and crystal build up? I've also see that people add a 5/8" bend on the inside, or say to make sure 1/4" passes into the chamber. What's the function of that? Does straight out the side work just fine?

I'll add a little on what I've found. The Auber mechanical relay PID SYL-2342 which has an internal relay that is good for 10A which I liked. I had also ordered a 380W band heater which is a little over three amps which would need an SSR with the others.

If you've got a tig but don't feel like welding copper with helium, or trying to tig copper with argon (my set up) I'm going to use silicone bronze to TIG braze. I'll update if it was a bad idea.

I had pooled a bunch of different net resources and ordered most everything already............. I'll be sure to note any significant errors or successes.
 

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Hello all!

I've been following this thread very eagerly! I'm just about ready to build my own and was wondering why these are made with primarily copper chambers? Could 416SS or 316SS be a good alternative--or is it just a price point that drives the use of copper?
 

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Hello all!

I've been following this thread very eagerly! I'm just about ready to build my own and was wondering why these are made with primarily copper chambers? Could 416SS or 316SS be a good alternative--or is it just a price point that drives the use of copper?
Hello grunt's, I have other answers to be send, but this is an important question and it has only to do with heat transfer. The K-type sensor is usually under the bowl, between the bowl bottom and unit frame, so any delay in energy traveling between the heat element and the K-type sensor can make setting the PID a nightmare. Believe me, I have tried, but always came back to copper.

More soon.

JoergK.
 

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Hello grunt's, I have other answers to be send, but this is an important question and it has only to do with heat transfer. The K-type sensor is usually under the bowl, between the bowl bottom and unit frame, so any delay in energy traveling between the heat element and the K-type sensor can make setting the PID a nightmare. Believe me, I have tried, but always came back to copper.

More soon.

JoergK.
Thanks for the info! I have a large supply of stainless that I thought I would use and machine down to what I need. I'll keep my eyes open for copper!
 
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