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As i expected my hives did not make it through the winter. I walked down in knee high snow to check them. I had 4 hives that I left a super almost full of honey and they not only died but the supers turned moldy along with all of the frames. I assume I can no longer use them given the old barn smell and black areas which i think is mold. My other hives that did not make it and did not have an extra super did not smell of mold or dead bees. Rather sad. I removed the smelly supers and set them out to air out. Is there anything I should be doing with the 3 lower brood boxes at this time? Also are the old supers that smell and appear moldy capable of reuse as I hate to lose the frames.
Thanks
 

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The solution to your problem is to let them dry out in the garage and get new bees on them. They will clean them up great but the woodware will be darkened. That is absolutely no big deal.
 

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Some black mold is totally normal. I wouldn't do anything special as far as bleach. I would go thru the hive sort thru combs, empty, pollen, bad comb, honey etc and knock out the dead bees. Keeping them outside won't be a problem until spring, maybe just provide extra ventillation to accelerate drying with bee tight screening. Ps handle the combs on a warm day otherwise they are brittle and can break easily.
 

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Woodedareas;
I am really sorry about your bees dying. That is so disheartening. Please don't be too discouraged. Check out every angle of what may have gone wrong, and make every change possible as you try it again. Check out hive location, ventilation, pests, hive management options, and ask lots of questions on this forum. There are folks on here who have walked your road, and they have found answers. We're all in this together, and we all love our bees.
As far as cleaning the equipment; if you choose to, you can pull the frames and use a butane torch to lightly disinfect the inside of your boxes. Scrape all the junk you can off first. The bees are real good at cleaning the comb, but if there are some frames that seem real bad, chick them. Keep the work load small for the new bees. If it is easier for them to clean the comb, let them do that instead of building new comb.
If you don't have a mentor, you might consider getting another experienced beekeeper to offer another perspective on aspects of your apiary and your methods.
Keep going forward.
 

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Would wrapping the frames in plastic then freezing them for a few days be a good idea? Might kill off any parasites/wax moth that are in the hive.
 

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Mold is no problem at all but check for AFB that you are not misinterpreting the smell. Sorry for your loss, I think I am in the same boat.
 
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