Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I really need help. I bought a lot of honey when traveling, but now the honey is separated, and I am concerned whether something was added to the honey to cause the separation. The crystalized part is very fluffy and like snow, but very light. Should I be concerned? Thank you very much. IMG_3624.jpg
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Should I be concerned?
Nope, all pure honey will eventually crystallize, some floral sources much faster than others. Set the jar in a pan of hot, but not boiling, water for an hour or so. Stir when it is uniformly warm and it should all reliquify.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope, all pure honey will eventually crystallize, some floral sources much faster than others. Set the jar in a pan of hot, but not boiling, water for an hour or so. Stir when it is uniformly warm and it should all reliquify.
Thanks, John. I have seen crystalized honey being sticky and hard, but this stuff is fluffy and soft. Is it honey or something else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think the honey became fermented, but I don't know what fermented honey is like. Is fermented honey very fluffy, soft and light?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,558 Posts
A wild guess. I wonder if somebody tried to make a creamed honey and in the process whipped in a lot of air. That is considered a negative happening, though I have seen creamed honey being spoken of as "whipped honey". I have next to no experience with creamed honey other than bits from reading. What you have there is nothing like what my honey looks like when it crystallizes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Hello I really need help. I bought a lot of honey when traveling, but now the honey is separated, and I am concerned whether something was added to the honey to cause the separation. The crystalized part is very fluffy and like snow, but very light. Should I be concerned? Thank you very much. View attachment 54023
Was the jar stored on its side? It appears crystallized. Usually there will be some liquid separation on top of the crystallized portion. To try and explain my experience better, when I have a bucket of crystallized honey and your wife starts scooping it out of the center, a depression will be formed. As this crater becomes larger the liquid will start to separate from the sides and fill in the hole. Since the crystals are drained they become whiter and somewhat fluffy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,066 Posts
I have had fermented honey exactly as Kate describes. It is fine to eat, but we especially enjoyed it in drinks in the summer. Vodka, lemonade and a teaspoon of it. Was also good in soda water or the various flavored seltzers they have. I think the bubbles from fermentation rise to the top and it eventually crystallizes forming resulting in a fluffy honey. J
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Looks like wax. That is the outcome of trying to get every little bit of profit from the bottom of the barrel. I let the bees clean that stuff up and melt it into blocks. Very fine wax. Good stuff.
 

·
Premium Member
Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
So, let's start with the honey is safe, even if slightly fermented. Heat the jar to 130° in a hot water bath on the stove. The honey will no longer be raw honey, but it will be pastuerized. If everything goes back into solution, it was sugar. If it remains on top, it is most likely wax, propolis, or pollen, the only other things that are ok to be in raw unfiltered honey (bee parts should have been strained out already).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,270 Posts
Doesn't fermented honey smell like yeast?

Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Fermented honey that has crystallized has the "trails" the bubbles made as they rose through the liquid honey to the surface "frozen" in place by the crystallization. Alex, I believe fermentING honey smells like yeast but once all the yeasts have been used it smells less yeasty over time. Anybody else seen that?
What you have looks like crystallized honey: the jar was stored on it's side and the liquid part was at the top. Honey crystallizes "from the bottom up." some honey crystallizes hard as a rock, some nice and creamy.
In either case it is useable. Did you try reliquifying it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Doesn't fermented honey smell like yeast?

Alex
Fermented honey smells more like wine, or maybe sour is another word that fits. I certainly have smelled it and I never thought of yeast.?

I have a lot of honey this past year that has a little liquid honey on top of what is now granulated honey. In my case it is because there are at least 2 varieties of honey in the mix. The lighter one does not want to granulate qne ends up on top.,

I've prouced raw honey for many years. The biggest problem with it is its appearance. How does it look? It is frequently not very attractive, depending on the floral sources. IMO that is why the bee world, as least in the US, was totally about 'pure honey' when I came along.

Pure honey is a product that has been heated and then put through a fine filter. The result is a product that has lost much of its nutritional value but stays liquid and looks nice.

It's also true that some single source raw honeys will stay liquid and look good for a long time before granulating. This seems to be true of alfalfa and Brazilian pepper. I'm sure there are others outside my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Doesn't fermented honey smell like yeast?

Alex
Fermented honey smells more like wine, or maybe sour is another word that fits. I certainly have smelled it and I never thought of yeast.

I have a lot of honey this past year that has a little liquid honey on top of what is now granulated honey. In my case it is because there are at least 2 varieties of honey in the mix. The lighter one does not want to granulate qne ends up on top.,

I've prouced raw honey for many years. The biggest problem with it is its appearance. How does it look? It is frequently not very attractive, depending on the floral sources. IMO that is why the bee world, as least in the US, was totally about 'pure honey' when I came along.

Pure honey is a product that has been heated and then put through a fine filter. The result is a product that has lost much of its nutritional value but stays liquid and looks nice.

It's also true that some single source raw honeys will stay liquid and look good for a long time before granulating. This seems to be true of alfalfa and Brazilian pepper. I'm sure there are others outside my experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Obviously a lot of wax on top, whoever sold it to you put wax in with the honey. Won't hurt you but I'd liquify it by gradually warming it up with hot water, not the microwave.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top