Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my eyes aren't so good. I have a hard time seeing in the cells when I check for brood. I know what to look for but just you know especially when there's that reflective stuff in the bottom of the cell I have a hard time telling what I'm looking at when its certain colors similar to brood. I'm not as young as I used to be either. I know the other tricks about holding the frames a certain way...

I now also understand better why some people like black plastic frames for this reason also.

Here's what I was wondering...

Will high lumen flash lights 'during the day' set off a bad defensive reaction if you use one to see in there better? Don't know why I didn't think about asking this before. (Yeah I get that it wouldn't be good to surprise them at night like this.)

But hey, if I do die I'd rather die with my boots on looking in a beehive than strapped to some chair in a rest home with bed bugs for 20 years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,770 Posts
try a hand held magnifying lens with a light on it, they work fine, most of the ones I have gotten over the years, the light fails fairly quickly though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
So my eyes aren't so good. I have a hard time seeing in the cells when I check for brood. I know what to look for but just you know especially when there's that reflective stuff in the bottom of the cell I have a hard time telling what I'm looking at when its certain colors similar to brood. I'm not as young as I used to be either. I know the other tricks about holding the frames a certain way...

I now also understand better why some people like black plastic frames for this reason also.

Here's what I was wondering...

Will high lumen flash lights 'during the day' set off a bad defensive reaction if you use one to see in there better? Don't know why I didn't think about asking this before. (Yeah I get that it wouldn't be good to surprise them at night like this.)

But hey, if I do die I'd rather die with my boots on looking in a beehive than strapped to some chair in a rest home with bed bugs for 20 years.
I also can't see that well so I have given up looking for eggs. I just look for larvae. I also look for covered brood as that appears a short while after larvae.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,419 Posts
Try taking a picture and then zooming in.
Try it and see how unpractical this is (while trying to work the bees live).
I can see something like this when checking a mini-nuc for a laying queen though.
 

·
Registered
Possum Valley, TN Bee Wrangler
Joined
·
975 Posts
There is the problem, pull them gloves off, thought your bees were very gentle?!?!

Taking pics is a good way to relax and look around at the bees. You can even share with others and ask questions about what is going on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
what color of foundation are you using, the black plastic frames for the brood chambers are my personal favorite. I have hard time with any other color and natural comb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
So my eyes aren't so good. I have a hard time seeing in the cells when I check for brood. I know what to look for but just you know especially when there's that reflective stuff in the bottom of the cell I have a hard time telling what I'm looking at when its certain colors similar to brood. I'm not as young as I used to be either. I know the other tricks about holding the frames a certain way...

I now also understand better why some people like black plastic frames for this reason also.

Here's what I was wondering...

Will high lumen flash lights 'during the day' set off a bad defensive reaction if you use one to see in there better? Don't know why I didn't think about asking this before. (Yeah I get that it wouldn't be good to surprise them at night like this.)

But hey, if I do die I'd rather die with my boots on looking in a beehive than strapped to some chair in a rest home with bed bugs for 20 years.
I have very terrible eyes (3200/20, both near and far sighted, double vision) and I’ve found that having another person really helps! If you can’t find someone to help you (and there might be some local kids who will do it for fun), then you can video it with your phone and review the footage later and input notes from there. It’s a bit complicated, but it works for me. As a side note, using a frame hanger makes it much, much easier to video or take pictures. To answer your original question, I don’t believe the flashlight would bother them, but I’m not certain. I have surprised a swarm building a hive in a jar at night with one of those military-grade flashlights and it was fine, but I’m not sure how different it would be with an established hive. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,459 Posts
I have two separate pairs of glasses, both bifocals. One is distance and near, the second pair is computer/reading. Makes a big difference which pair of glasses I am using.

I bet if you asked an eye doctor they could get you a prescription for very near vision that would help a lot.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top