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I had two very strong hives that swarmed and we captured the two largest swarms I've ever seen within fifteen minutes of each other 14 days ago. We had just recently robbed last Fall's honey and had wet honey supers so we thought they would be perfect to use for most of the swarm hive box frames. After seven days we did a quick check through all four hives and found a queen in one of the swarm hives but no eggs or brood on any frames in any box in any of the four hives. There continues to be a lot of activity at each hive but no noticeable pollen coming in and the boxes were full of bees & uncapped nectar/honey. I went back through the swarm hives today (14 days) - loads of nectar, some capped honey around the edges of some frames, what looks like a few pollen cells here and there, plenty of drawn out wax but still no eggs or brood. I've spent the last hour & a half perusing the internet and found what seems to be a multitude of answers but no clear consensus- how long do I have before I need to start worrying about being queenless? Should I go out and buy 1, 2, 3 or 4 queens? With all four hives without eggs I have no frames of brood/eggs to share. Thoughts?
 

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That sucks, both swarms had no brood at all after 14 days? I would say they are queenless now.

The main hives probably had capped or close to capped queen cells when they swarmed, so 7 or 8 days old from egg. Add 14, and you are at day 21 or 22. That means the virgin queens are on their mating flights now, so I would wait another week before I started to worry.

My response assumes that each swarm was a prime swarm (with the old mated queen) and they left queen cells behind in the old hive.
 

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That sucks, both swarms had no brood at all after 14 days? I would say they are queenless now.

The main hives probably had capped or close to capped queen cells when they swarmed, so 7 or 8 days old from egg. Add 14, and you are at day 21 or 22. That means the virgin queens are on their mating flights now, so I would wait another week before I started to worry.

My response assumes that each swarm was a prime swarm (with the old mated queen) and they left queen cells behind in the old hive.
Yea, we were really motivated to get serious about our beekeeping this year and while the swarms were a big plus, this little lull is a bit disheartening. The worst case is I go out and buy a few mated queens. Thanks for your response. Oh, I'm fairly sure one of the swarms was a secondary as we had caught a swarm earlier that only chose to stay with us for 2-3 days.
 

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I am open to all opinions. Do I wait 21 days, 28 days, panic now? I would like to hear what you think.
 

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If you think one swarm has a virgin queen, its been my experience that larva start showing at about 28 days for me. Eggs probably show earlier, with my eyes I just have hard time seeing eggs. Go to Michael Bush's web site and look at his "queen math" to get an idea of how long from egg or larva till a queen starts laying. If no eggs or larva after 28 days, order queens. Anyone close by that you can get a couple frames of very young brood from?

Sounds like both swarms may have had virgin queens and they could start laying any day.

Like you said, large swarms are usually prime swarms with the old queen. These may just have virgins. When I have trouble finding a queen, I'll check for her without smoking the hive. I usually find her then. For some reason smoke makes them hide, at least from what I see.

Good luck and keep us informed.
 
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