Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I visited Autozone just the other day to purchase a new car battery and while at the parts counter I happened to look down at the small shelves about knee level and there was a stainless steel hive tool, they must have these stocked to sell as gasket scrapers. I can't remember what the exact price was but something in the range of $6.00 to $7.00 comes to mind, not too bad a price if you needed one real quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,186 Posts
That is worth checking out. Does it have the good usable nail puller? Most new hive tools have it but the hole is not dished to allow you to get under nail heads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,000 Posts
I have a hunch that what you're calling a hive tool is actually a pry bar/scraper.
I can't say for sure, but my guess is that this tool was first used in the construction industry before it was adopted by the bee industry. Anyone know for sure?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,280 Posts
my local ace hardware had a stainless pry bar/scraper for 5 or 6 dollars, not as nicely polished as my mann-lake one but nearly identical. they both work identically
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes I think it did have the nail puller and it was very well polished and sharp edged. Barry, the one you have linked is very similar to what I seen at Autozone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
I went to one of the "cheap tool" places on vacation once. Found the tool I use, which is a stainless steel molding pry bar. Looks the same as some hive tools and works great. I found it in the section with the other pry bars for $6.00, Looking around more, I found the same tool in the womens section for $3.00. Was it because it had a pink sticker on it? Didn't matter, pink sticker came off and I got a two-fer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Yes, I'm fairly certain the tool was intended as a pry bar before beekeepers adopted it. I owned some before I ever kept bees. Used them for removing trim and woodwork in my old house. Worked great! Now it has a new life covered in propolis :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
133 Posts
I went to walmart and found the hive tool that's American made 9 1/2 inches and comes with a 7 1/2 inches To for the price of about $8.00 both have nail puller on them not bad!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,186 Posts
I believe rather firmly that the original hive tool was a Red Devil Paint Scraper. It was and is the handiest tool ever invented in my opinion. I have two hive tools bought in the early seventies and they clearly gives a patent number and has the red devil logo of the time. I have one in every tool kit in the house. Plumbing, sheet rocking, automotive, carpentry and of course my bee box has several. The two survivors from long ago have perfectly functional nail pullers. The mann lake ones are just clubs in comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
732 Posts
I bought two packs of these small nail pry bars from menards. Good price and my wife bought me a ton. Can fit two easily in my suit pocket so I always have a few on me. I have a large hive tool I got from Mann lake. I use it to scrape but otherwise I don't use it a lot.

http://www.menards.com/main/tools-h...-bars/5-1-2-mini-pry-bar/p-1465858-c-9170.htm

Pretty sure that's it, but I got them in two packs and on sale. Handy, but they don't scrape well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,315 Posts
I like the Italian style with the j-hook on the end. For those of us who don't get into the hives as often as perhaps we should, those tools are great for prying off propolized inners and then separating and lifting stuck frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,186 Posts
I have never tried the hooked ones, I can do what I need with the old traditional. It is an all the time all season tool at my house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34,542 Posts
I have a hunch that what you're calling a hive tool is actually a pry bar/scraper.
I can't say for sure, but my guess is that this tool was first used in the construction industry before it was adopted by the bee industry. Anyone know for sure?
No, I don't, but I see them in hardware stores sold as window pry bars. I wonder if they are all tempered the same.

The flat j hooked tool is the only one I ever broke prying apart bee boxes. Snapped right off behind the wide end where it narrowed down. That tool is especially handy for working w/ one piece plastic frames that one doesn't want to pry up from under the top bar edge.

It would be an interesting bit of trivia to know when hive tools became hive tool and were they designed for beekeeping or for some other use first. I have seen specially designed knives in old illustrations of 17th century beekeeping. So there have probably always been specialized tools. What did LLL use? If anyone can find the first/earliest Root Co. or Dadant Co. Catalog it would be interesting to see if they sold hive tools along w/ the smokers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Looks like a fine hive tool Levi, and its made in USA. It appears these scrapers/hive tools can be found in a number of local locations.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top