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I got two nuke's about a week ago and I did my first hive inspection yesterday. So in #1 hive I found the queen and and lots of larva capped and uncapped. Looks good. Now hive #2 I could not find a queen. Not saying she wasn't there because I did see a few uncapped larva. Well anyway they are making a lot of drone cells and maybe a queen cell ??? Here so picture of whats going on. Are they getting ready to swarm?
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they look queen less
were they loud? kind of a roar?
if not then they may have a virgin, or she may have stopped laying.
queen may have been sqished on the last inspection.

give them a week maybe shake a frame from the queen rite with eggs and shake an emptyish brood frame here and swap them.
the queen rite hive gets a comb to lay in and the questionable hive gets eggs to make a queen if needed.
look back at the frame you gave in 5 days for Queen cell starts, I would place it in the center of the hive for best results.

if QCs started they are queen less if not they "think" they are fine.

GG
 

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What you see is what was going on in the parent hive. Are the bees loud or quiet? If they are loud you should talk to your nuc provider. Do it now. He needs to know there is a problem now. A month in queenless is your problem. One week should be his problem. If they are queenless he should provide you with a queen. Call him and ask him if it is possible for him to check. At the very least find someone who is more experienced with bees to check the hive out.
 

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There are eggs in the cells with the same frame as the queen cup. Since there is only one egg, and it's centered in the cell, I'm fairly certain you have a laying queen in there, or did in the last 3 days. At any case, they would be making a new queen from those eggs.

The Queen cell is just a cup, if it doesn't have a larvae in it there is nothing to worry about. Bees make cups all throughout the hive, almost as a "just in case" insurance policy.

Give them a few days and check again. If you still have eggs then they are entirely fine, no need to keep disturbing them in looking for the queen herself.

And I see nothing abnormal about the amount of drone cells in there. Looks like a good nuc needing space to grow.
 

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Looks like you transferred them just in time, because it appears they were starting to back fill the brood nest? Good eyes mtnmyke
 

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There are eggs in the cells with the same frame as the queen cup. Since there is only one egg, and it's centered in the cell, I'm fairly certain you have a laying queen in there, or did in the last 3 days. At any case, they would be making a new queen from those eggs.

The Queen cell is just a cup, if it doesn't have a larvae in it there is nothing to worry about. Bees make cups all throughout the hive, almost as a "just in case" insurance policy.

Give them a few days and check again. If you still have eggs then they are entirely fine, no need to keep disturbing them in looking for the queen herself.

And I see nothing abnormal about the amount of drone cells in there. Looks like a good nuc needing space to grow.
good catch mtnmyke i see in the second pick toward the top a couple cells with eggs.
it could be that they made the NUC up then gave it a queen and they had started the cups.

agree give them a few days.

GG
 

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pic 1 - There is a queen cup, and cells with eggs standing up. Queen has been there in the last couple days to lay. If the cup has no egg in it, it's not a queen cell.
pic 2 - More eggs standing up.
pic 3 - Nothing special. some brood almost ready to emerge, a few drone cells. Very typical of a frame from the nest in a strong colony.
pic 4 - To blurry to be definitive on anything other than it's a large patch of emerged brood, some pollen. Would not surprise me to find the queen on that one if it was focussed
pic 5 - Backfilling where brood has emerged.

If you are feeding this nuc, take away the liquid feed. They will swarm if they backfill to the point the queen has no place to lay anymore.

I think one of the biggest mistakes folks make with a new nuc or package, they overfeed and the bees backfill the brood nest before they have time to build comb on new frames. Been there, done that, I have that t-shirt. they have been in place for a week, so they foraging force will be oriented on the new location. It's a small colony, they have enough coming in to backfill, so the liquid is coming faster than they can build comb. There is more than ample liquid in those frames to sustain them for a few days.

For this colony to progress without swarming, you need them to be using those cells for brood, once all of the current brood emerges there will be enough bees to start building comb on the adjacent frames earnestly. Until then, the goal is to keep the queen laying, and for that she needs space. She was in this colony laying in the last two days, if those eggs in the first photo were 3 days old they would be laying on the side.

If the cup in the first photo has an egg or larvae in it, scrape it when you remove the feed.
 
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