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I got my first sting today, on my eye lid of all places. Besides the initial pain of the sting the tingle feeling afterwards is kind of relaxing and almost addictive in a way. Is it just me or does anyone else have this experience
 

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Wait till tomorrow "Nathan Puffy Eye" :cool: You might want to put some ice on it....sooner rather than later. Then again, you could be fortunate like my husband who barely reacts at all. I turn into the Michelin Woman on day 2. Ice tomorrow is too late. A sting is invigorating in a way...until the swelling and itch kicks in the next day...
 

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To answer your question - NO

Nobody says that you are a freak though. Look on the bright side. You would not have to invest into a bee suit - you can do your beekeeping naked and the meaner the bees are the better!
 

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Are stings supposed to feel good, almost addictive ... :lpf:

Haha, just kidding with that laughing smiley face...

Yes, actually, I find them to be invigorating and euphoric for me. Pretty strange huh?
 

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After developing an immunity to bee venom (little swelling or itching), I found that more than a dozen stings to the ankle made it feel really good. It's a good, soothing, warmish feeling and feels like the circulation is really stepped up. Feels kinda buzzy! lol But man, we itched like monkeys until the immunity built up.

Bee venom contains the chemicals dopamine and seratonin, etc. These are feel-good chemicals already present in the human body. Bee stings add to that.
 

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By the time you get this you'll probably be hating life and won't be able to see out of that eye ... and it'll be itching like mad. Perhaps you'll change your outlook on the sting addiction now...
 

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First year keeping, played with them a couple times with no suiting up, then one of you guys gave some good advice, I took it and now suit up with vail all the time. (all ready can't see, why lose an eye) More power to all you guys in T-shirts and shorts.
 

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That sounds like a classic endorphin reaction. The body has a natural painkiller, discovered a couple of decades back, called endorphine. Morphine is a mimic of this painkiller, and the name means "internal morphine". It is supposed to be 100x as potent as morphine and just as addictive. Runners are notorious for becoming addicted to it. Lance Armstrong was asked how he dealt with pain while cycling, and replied "I ride FOR the pain."
 

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I say, "phooey(!) on this 'feels so good, macho stuff." :) Bee stings are supposed to hurt, and so your natural reaction should be to prudently avoid them.

For example ... go ahead, spend $20, and buy a bee veil (and a straw-hat to put it on), so that honeybees will never again sting you in the face. Ditto a pair of long-sleeved lightweight leather bee-gloves, both so that you can keep your hands clean and so that they won't sting you in the fingers.

Beyond that, hey, it's entirely up to you. As for me, a lightweight set of painter's coveralls, full of plentious pockets(!), was a mighty great investment.

"Stinging," after all, "is what honeybees do." But that don't mean that you have to put up with it. :)

Yeah, yeah. I have worked with my bees in the northwest Georgia (USA) summertime, in shorts and a T-shirt, but the thought does occur to me that maybe the insects thought that I stunk as bad as I probably did. So, mebbe they had mercy on me. ;) Anyhow, I decided that what I needed was: a sting-free face, clean hands, and plenty o' pockets. Works for me.
 

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I have been stung many times. I find it neither stimulating or horrible. I don't swell at all so no big deal. (At least off Honey Bees.) I feel it for a few minutes and then it's gone. I have been stung on the right side of my eye twice this year. No swelling. I don't particularly enjoy it though, I do wear my bee suite when working with them.
 

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That sounds like a classic endorphin reaction. The body has a natural painkiller, discovered a couple of decades back, called endorphine. Morphine is a mimic of this painkiller, and the name means "internal morphine". It is supposed to be 100x as potent as morphine and just as addictive. Runners are notorious for becoming addicted to it. Lance Armstrong was asked how he dealt with pain while cycling, and replied "I ride FOR the pain."
Umm, didn't he "ride for the pain" so he could smoke, um I mean use, something more oraganic for the pain?:shhhh:
 

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Hi, my name is Colobee, and it's been 24 hours since my last sting :)lpf:) (that was really good :D )

It still always hurts, as it should. It still usually itches for a day or two, or sometimes four. It sometimes swells like a big jelly bag when the strike is near an artery - like the one where my right arm gauntlet cinches below the inside elbow. Mine should have a big black tattoo there that say's "sting here for best effect" (they seem to have already figured that out). It eventually feels good on my tired old lower back, but I don't get any euphoria and still avoid as many as I can, in every way I can.
 

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"Hi, my name is Nathan, it's been 18 days since my last sting..."
...:lpf: Ok, now that I've regained composure, (assuming I ever really had any...) but seriously... I'm not quite sure weather the response should be "Hi Nathan welcome!"... or are we still waiting for your confession?

Is it just me? Or was I reading with my Monty Python glasses again?
 
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