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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In one of my double nuc boxes (Michael Palmer style) one part needs to be treated for varoa (12 mites per 300 according to alcohol wash). I was going to use Api Life Var for now. But should I apply treatment only to the contaminated part of the box or to both? I was going to apply treatment to whole box (both parts) for at least first two intervals. For the last interval I may apply only to the contaminated part. But I wanted to check if anybody have experience with this approach and can share their outcome.

Thanks!
 

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I guess I don't understand why you would not treat both. Mites build up fast and this season I wouldn't mess around. That said, I'm a newbie and I lost a bunch of hives in the last two years waiting to treat too late in the Fall. Slow learner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I'm newbie myself. And my thinking is that any sort of treatment is a stress to the colony. If colony can make it on it's own - you better to let them.
In double nuc colonies are pretty well separated, mites would not crawl to the neighboring nuc. Although worker drifting from one to another is very well possible.
Also, Api Life Var works through creating certain concentration of bunch of oils in the closed space of a hive. In double nuc hive air gets exchanged rather easily, which would be a reason to apply treatment to both parts. So, that's why I wonder if anybody already went through the same debate and have experience to share.
 

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I never treat just one hive in an apiary. When I treat, I treat them all, at least initially. Retreating, I might only hit the worst of them.

Therfore, I would treat both sides of the double nuc.

Regarding stressing the bees with treatment, I have yet (in 3 years keeping) to regret treating. I have several times regretted not treating, or not treating earlier. The bees get over the stress of treating, they do not get over getting overrun with varroa.
 

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Regarding stressing the bees with treatment, I have yet (in 3 years keeping) to regret treating. I have several times regretted not treating, or not treating earlier. The bees get over the stress of treating, they do not get over getting overrun with varroa.
Yes. Watching a hive get overrun and treating too late is horrible. If you've proved your bees can resist varroa, that's one thing. If your bees have proved they cannot resist, that's something different. I got overconfident because my first two hives were really excellent at fighting mites. I later got some more hives that were completely non-resistant and didn't follow up fast enough. They went down hard and they took my good bees with them.
 

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Yes. Watching a hive get overrun and treating too late is horrible. If you've proved your bees can resist varroa, that's one thing. If your bees have proved they cannot resist, that's something different. I got overconfident because my first two hives were really excellent at fighting mites. I later got some more hives that were completely non-resistant and didn't follow up fast enough. They went down hard and they took my good bees with them.
My first year, I figured I had magic bees, because I didn't see mites. Of course, I was wrong. :doh:

Not discounting the possibility that some can go treatment free, but I certainly can't so far.
 
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