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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
It looks like buying 10 to 49 Apivar 50 packs a colony treatment would run you $4.68 per brood chamber. Seems a bit pricey, but is it if it works well? Less mess and safer to handle than MAQS. And MAQS aren't all that less in cost per recommended treatment.

What do you commercial guys think? I'm thinking about installing them in colonies in the south in April so I can take them out well before honey supers need to go on in NY.

Maybe this time of year OA dribble is the way to go?
 

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I've used Apivar a number of times and have always been satisfied with the performance... I've heard from a number of sources that the full 56 day treatment is important though as it has little to no cell penetration.
 

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Maybe this time of year OA dribble is the way to go?
Mark, I think you missed the window for this. I'm betting that they are brooding up big time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Poss bull, poss bull, Dan.

Are they approved for use in SC and NY?
 

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One reason ( out of many ) I switched to single hive body management was to increase the efficacy of the Apivar treatment. I will treat the single hive body with two strips. Cheaper treatment than in doubles and the bees are forced onto the strips.
Apivar is a good mite treatment.
 

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Maybe this time of year OA dribble is the way to go?
Mark, you've missed the boat on OA dribble. It does destroy some brood and doesn't do a thing for the mites in the brood ... where many are breeding if you have em. OAV is too time consuming for a commercial guy this time of year as you'd have to do it multiple times to catch the mites as they are emerging with the brood. Apivar is good way to go..... but as you said, costly.
 

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Allen Dick is just discussing this on his diary at honeybeeworld.com
It looks like buying 10 to 49 Apivar 50 packs a colony treatment would run you $4.68 per brood chamber. Seems a bit pricey, but is it if it works well? Less mess and safer to handle than MAQS. And MAQS aren't all that less in cost per recommended treatment.

What do you commercial guys think? I'm thinking about installing them in colonies in the south in April so I can take them out well before honey supers need to go on in NY.

Maybe this time of year OA dribble is the way to go?
 

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I made 45 splits on march 7th. I put two stips per single deep box. When I did the splits I could see mites, and lots of them on the bees. I checked on march 22nd for my queen take and didn't see any mites. I hope to do a mite test as soon as the weather straightens up.
 

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I was seeing way more mites then I have before on bees and drone brood this spring. im thinking of doin oa dribble on the new splits that I made from a cell and 2-3 frms brood. the new queen will just have started laying and the old brood should be mostly hatched. im mostly worried about hurting the bees that are left that have to live until the new queens brood starts hatching. and I want the temps to not be so hot and things are heating up in tx.

why do you say it is to much work to do a dribble for a commercial. it seems like a commercial is in his hives every week so you just carry the sprayer and give them a dribble every time your in the yard this spring. between checking for queen right, feed and adding supers, it seems like you could easily put a dribble on every hive once a week. but can the bees handle that?

im saving that expensive apivar treatment for august when you really need the silver bullet. it seems like for me if you split them down and requeen with a cell it buys you a good amount of time but if you don't treat when the honey is pulled in early august, you can kiss them good by.
 

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why do you say it is to much work to do a dribble for a commercial.
I'm not sure who said it was too much work for a commercial. From everything I've seen, it is the treatment of choice by commercials during periods of broodlessness. Inexpensive, effective and easy to do.

Edit: I see the too much work comment. It was in reference to periods where there is brood and would require multiple treatments.
 

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I'm not sure who said it was too much work for a commercial.
I mentioned that OAV was too time consuming this time of year (due to the need for multiple treatments to treat mites coming out with emerging brood.)
Dribbling and OAV only kill phoretic mites. Dribbling hurts brood, OAV does not)...but again OAV this time of year would require multiple treatments....too time consuming for a commercial ..
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Too much work for a commercial outfit to do OA vaporization, not dribble. That's what was said.
 

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One reason ( out of many ) I switched to single hive body management was to increase the efficacy of the Apivar treatment. I will treat the single hive body with two strips. Cheaper treatment than in doubles and the bees are forced onto the strips.
Apivar is a good mite treatment.
I used 2 in my singles last fall and it worked great. Trying to decide what to alternate with when they get back from CA. Any suggestions?
 
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