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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I left my honey super on during an Apivar treatment last fall. I ended up leaving the super on for the bees as extra food since this is my first winter and wanting to give them the best chances of success.
In any event, I'm wondering whether I can use those frames again for gathering honey this coming year for human consumption or whether I will have to scrap them clean of wax in the spring and have the bees "have at it" again.
I'm using Rite-Cell plastic foundation so can reuse that without too much fuss - I would think.

Looking for peoples thoughts on the matter.
 

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From my understanding, Apivar is not a nasty contaminator of wax comb. However, the honey in those supers is not suitable for human consumption. So, you need to put those supers about 100 yards away (if possible) from the hives this spring to avoid a robbing situation & let bees rob them out for a day or so. They will clean them out really well. Then you can use your supers again for new honey. Save yourself this problem by following the instructions on the pesticide label. If you are in a pinch & need to treat, remove the super, freeze the honey frames for a couple of days & go from there.
 

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In any event, I'm wondering whether I can use those frames again for gathering honey this coming year for human consumption or whether I will have to scrap them clean of wax in the spring and have the bees "have at it" again.
"Apivar treatment is permissible in spring and autumn. Residue examinations have shown5:
1. The absence of detectable amitraz in samples.
2. The label mentions that the strips must be removed two weeks before supers are introduced in spring, or placed after supers are removed in late summer. This point is recommended by good apicultural practices to treat outside exploited honey flow periods to guarantee honey quality.
However, it is relevant to add that the presence of residue (in the form of metabolites) is analyzed at levels lower than the authorized MRL (Maximum Residue Limit) even during treatment carried out during the honey flow."
This is what the manufacturer says .

The issue of residues is not a simple matter and should not be analyzed from the point of view of 0 % is OK ; 0.1 % is bad . MRLs help us to have a more realistic and correct perspective. JMO, do as you understand.
 

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Well, here is what the manufacture says.

Toxic for mites but safe for your beeswax, queens and respectful for your hive products.
Apivar® leaves the bee, honey and wax and all other hive-derived products unaffected.
Studies have proven that under normal conditions and use Apivar® is harmless for the bee and for all products made in the hive. Investigations designed to detect residues of active substance in honey, wax, propolis and pollen have shown that you may harvest these products immediately after the end of the treatment period, no withdrawal time being necessary.

Thanks to the progressive and measured release of the active substance from the unique Apivar® formulation, your hive is healthy and its products are free from contamination.

Moreover after successive Apivar® treatments for several years, no accumulation of Amitraz residues can be noticed even in wax.

SO. I would say the wax is safe to use for honey for human consumption!
 

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Well, here is what the manufacture says.
Tenbears in different words we say the same.:)
My source is http://www.veto-pharma.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Apivar-FAQ-USA-2015.pdf

What is your source? I would like to refer to it and mentioned it in my blog to demystify the issue residues. In Portugal this aspect is poorly understood. There ares beekeepers here that do not deal properly and timely with the mites in their hives because they think Apivar left dangerous residues in honey. Bad information and bad service to beekeeping my country.
 

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It may be overkill but in your case I think I would just designate it as a brood comb box and let a strong hive grow up into it in the early spring prior to any surplus honey boxes being placed on. I sure wouldnt put it out to be robbed on.
 

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Agree with jim lyon, if the bees rob it out, they may be putting the honey in supers on their hives and you have the same issue. I would use as a brood box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Not sure how much honey will be left after this winter in the super but whatever is, I will remove it and save it for next winter (feed back to the bees in the fall) aka not for human consumption. Since I don't have an extractor, I'll probably end up removing a lot of the comb cell wax in the process but feel better that I could reuse that for some other purpose.

Thanks for your thoughts
Pooh Bear
 

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the reply above your is from 2016 look at the top line in the post.
Perhaps it has been discontinued.

GG
 
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