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I just purchased apivar strips and read the instruction that the need to be in for 42 days and removed for 14 before any honey supers are placed on the hive. I am in Ohio and 60 days pretty much covers both honey flows from 6/1 to 8/31. How am I to use this treatment if I need to use it during summer temps and I can't place it along with any supers. Is this treatment designed for warmer climates? Or am I missing something any help is appreciated.
 

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I used oxalic acid last year with a vaporizer. I was trying to use a simpler method. Do you have experience with oxalic acid in a sugar solution?
 

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You can't, use oxcilic acid or Formic acid or such.
Exactly. It's for use either before or after a honey flow.

You could also try Hopguard III and then use your Apivar for your fall treatment, after the flow.
 

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My recomendation would be to use the apivar in the fall or winter. Formic acid (maqs) is ok to use with honey supers but watch your temperatures. I put apivar in the spring but I also split everything pretty heavy and plan on not taking any honey. My eventual plan is to use oxalic acid in the winter when the bees are broodless and maybe a spring formic acid. hopefully that will keep the mites at bay. I don't know what will work with these temps, maybe hopguard. If you have to pull supers try to pull them between main flows.
 

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Have you done any testing of your bees for mites? What's the count? Before you start treatment it might be nice to know if it's needed. Why are you putting in Apivar strips now? Is this an established hive? Or a new nuc or package?
 

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I am proactive not reactive! I did do some formic acid treatments late last fall but since I knew I wanted to split the hives and a commercial beekeeper moves bees in nearby in early spring I wanted to eliminate the existing mites and any mites from drift. I plan to do a better oxalic acid treatment this fall/winter so next year I will actually test for the mites before I do anything. I was short on time and wanted a lot out of my bees and mites are too big of a problem. Also I needed a better understanding of mite treatments, my old ways were to mass medicate with amitraz. Now I am rebuilding and want to focus more on bee genetics to solve the problem.
 

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I am proactive not reactive!
Proactive is testing and then treating if you need to. Prophylactic is treating whether or not you need to. If your situation demands a prophylactic approach to varroa, then also treat in August when your winter bees are starting to grow, because the mite damage during that larval development period is what's going to impact your bees the most.

Here's a guide you can use for an overall IPM strategy for mites with a lot of options. They do recommend treating only after testing above the threshold, but you mentioned being short on time so do what you need to do. I think that you'll find the more time you can put into the bees, the more they'll be able to give back.
 

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Well I remember the threshold use to be 6 mites per hundred, now it is 3 mites per hundred. So if the goal post keeps moving why wait until you reach the threshold? Why not knock them before you start raising a lot of brood and a lot of subsequent mites? Bob Binney treats twice in the winter with OA, I don't think he is testing in the winter before the OA applications. Alot of commercial guys do very little testing and just mass treat. I am not saying that is correct, I am getting things in order to do more testing. For my specific situation of getting up at 4:30 in the morning and working 15 hours a day at a job, plus trying to take care of my elderly parents, take care of the property, fix everything that is broken and get enough bees to become an income source rather than a money hole I believed at the time it would be better to assume I had elevated mite levels and treat them. Also, my plan is to make as many nucs as possible that can over winter in our cold colorado winters out of 3 colonies. Considering adverse effects of mite treatments such as possible brood rearing reduction during formic acid treatments I chose apivar because I have not had any problems with it in the past, I don't have to worry about temperature, I can split a 10 frame hive at anytime during the treatment period and just put one strip in each nuc without interuption of the treatment itself. Maybe I am wrong but if I tested and mite levels were at 2% and I start making nucs then they are 3-5% percent when I have some small 3 frame nucs how would I treat them??? Most treatment are setup for a minimum of 5 frames of bees, most are for 8-10 frames. So in my thinking proactive is to treat prior to having smaller nucs that would be a against the law (the label directions are the law) to treat with a higher dose than recommended or manipulating the dosage. Not that I am that concerned about that part of it, just figured it would be easier on me and easier on the bees to treat before making some small splits.
 

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Apivar has a very long treatment window, but the strips won't go to waste if you use them after your August flow. As mentioned by others, if you have supers on Hopguard and formic are the two treatments you can apply without contaminating your honey. If your focus this year is for splits, splits and more splits, then you may not need to worry about it.

As for the why not part, chemical treatments do stress the bees, there is some risk of queen loss, and I'm stingy with my bee budget. What I don't spend on chemicals I can spend elsewhere. If I were in your situation, I might also opt for treating only because what's best is not always what's possible.
 

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Also worth pointing out that Apivar is not effective as advertised.

So keep that in mind.
 
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