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Folks,

After reading some posts, I went and purchased a stethoscope so that I too could listen against the Supers to determine if my girls are alive. I don't think I heard anything. Shouldn't they be making buzzing sounds or at least just say ahhhh.


Did I just waste $20 or what?
 

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I just came in from putting my ear up to the hives to listen. I do almost everyday. I can hear them and it is soothing and reassuring to me. A sethoscope would be great!
 

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You may need to move around and listen at different areas on the boxes. Tap on the sides a few times as you change locations and you should hear them buzzing when you are near the cluster.

Also, check your stethoscope and try to twist the hose at the bell connection and see if it makes a half turn and clicks. In one position it is very sensitive and gives you great sound amplification. In the other you will have a hard time hearing them. That's how mine is anyway.
 

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I work in healthcare and use a stethoscope at work. So I borrowed it for a day as an experiment, since I had been simply putting my ear to the hive and wondered if the stethoscope would be better.

In my opinion, I can hear the bees better with my ear pressed right to the hive. The stethoscope was okay, but it just wasn't as clear as my ear. Just my 2c worth.
 

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Tried ear and stethoscope. Can't hear anything. But then it's been cold and windy. Didn't move all around the boxes trying to find sound.
 

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A long screwdriver works good as a stethoscope. Just press the handle tightly against your ear.

It works great as a mechanics stethoscope too, for finding the exact locations of noises in an engine.
 

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I am in Missouri and just came out of 10 days of weather that was in the teens & single digits. Today as well as several times during the cold weather I placed my ear against the hive to listen for my bees. I could hear them buzzing loud and clear.
 

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I have used one for a long time. I have always had the best luck hearing them by the upper entrance. If I dont here anything alittle tap will get them buzzing. I dont even bother unless the wind is calm
 

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There's an inexpensive mechanic's stethoscope that has a long thin metal rod instead of the usual bell hearing piece that can be used to hear bees. However it does not seem to work half as well as a rolled up magazine and a hard knock against the side to hear the roar and to try to judge their condition. Usually though, nothing is needed but a hard knock and they can be heard. Good idea to check them and to notice if there are a few dead ones on the outside as proof that they can get out and fly with all this cold and snow. Once saved what later became an excellent hive because I opened them up, (wrapped hive), in early Feb., when I couldn't hear them with the rolled up magazine. It turned out to be a very small cluster but they were alive. Dribbled some honey right onto them and started feeding more honey and granulated sugar. Beautiful black queen, very prolific later that year - a really worthwhile save honeywise as well. The kind of experience you remember for years. OMTCW
 

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Like danno I can hear them best by placing the stethoscope over the upper vent hole. Normally you will hear them loud and clear. If not give the hive a little tap. If you hear nothing nobody is home.
 

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Mother-n-law was a nurse so I picked up an old stethoscope and have been using it on the bee hive. I can hear the soothing hmmmmm, even through the plastic insulation. Hope you find the hive heart-beat!:)

Chris
 

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Daughter got a stethoscope in a Junior Dr. kit she got for Christmas, and it works great for the bees. I like it because it lets me listen without kneeling in the snow. Also, it seems like I can get an idea of where the cluster is inside the hive because the sound is louder in certain areas. Somehow, that seems reassuring to me.

It definitely doesn't work on days with high wind, and like others have said, I have to listen on different sides of the hive and move up and down to zero in on them.

My daughter has been able to come out and listen to them also, which is pretty cool. Usually the beekeeping activities are only dad's business, even with the child's suit we got her. This way she can be an active part of monitoring the health of the hives over the winter.

I don't think you wasted your money.
 
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