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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried to make the circular saw jig and the jig it came out perfect. The problem is it will not work. In order to get the blade on 20 degres i don't have enough depth to cut the handhold but 1/2 in. Also the saw is too faraway from the top to get the right distance. If i turn the saw around i can't get the blade to adj.am i missing something. Maye i could buy a lefthand saw.:scratch:
 

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I believe that Cleo's jig is intended for a saw with a fairly standard 7.25" blade. But there are saws with smaller blades - for instance I also have a Ryobi battery operated circular saw with a 5.5" blade.

Could your saw blade be less than 7.25" diameter?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My saw is a Dewalt with a 71/4 blade.
 

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I have a cheap plastic 7.25" Black and Decker, and the jig works great! Have you watched Cleo's video to see what you might be doing wrong?
 

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i cobbled one together that is very similar to Cleo's. i don;t remember what i used for material, or the angle, but if you have too much angle, or too thick of a material as a base, i could see you running into problems. with cut depth
 

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Ted n Ms. My saw is a Skil, and the base will adjust two ways. One is for bevel, and the other is for depth of cut.

I am not familiar with the DeWalt saw, but, does the base adjust for depth of cut.

Could you either post a photo of your saw here, or, send an e-mail to me [email protected] and i will try to help. I have never had anyone say that it wouldn't work. I suspect you may have the wrong saw. I did not know that they made left and right hand saws until someone brought it to my attention.

When you look at the photos that accompany the jig instructions, does your saw look like that one. That is, when you place the saw in the jig, is the saw blade facing you, or away from you.

And yes, if the base is too thick, the blade will not cut deep enough.

cchoganjr
 

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Can some wood worker look at the photo of the saw I used in the demonstration and tell me if it is a left hand saw or a right hand saw.

Until it was brought to my attention, I did not know they made right and left hand. All the ones I have ever seen are like the one used in the video.

100_0256.JPG

cchoganjr
 

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A left handed saw has the blade on the left of the motor when looking in the cutting direction, as does this Bosch left hand saw ...

Photo linked from here: http://www.boschtools.com/Products/Tools/Pages/BoschProductDetail.aspx?pid=CS5

In comparison, the blade in Cleo's photo is on the right side of the motor when looking in the cut direction.

While the photos are of saws of slightly different design, the dust chute at the rear of the blade guard clearly indicates the cutting direction is at the other end of the saw
 

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Ted n Ms... Others..... There is another video on U-Tube by someone who goes by the title, "1952 Jeep" . He said he had to modify the jig to get it to work for his saw. He explains how he modified it. On my computer it comes up when my video comes up. Maybe it will help.

Radar can probably post a link to this video. Not sure, but, his saw might be a De Walt.

cchoganjr
 

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If I am reading this correctly you are tilting the blade? The sled gives you the slope, you do not tilt the blade. Put the blade at 90 degrees and turn the saw around (not get a left handed saw).
I could see how you would want to in order to get the top of the cut out square but that is not the design.
Thanks again Cleo!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If I am reading this correctly you are tilting the blade? The sled gives you the slope, you do not tilt the blade. Put the blade at 90 degrees and turn the saw around (not get a left handed saw).
I could see how you would want to in order to get the top of the cut out square but that is not the design.
Thanks again Cleo!
If the top of handhold is not square it is not the design i want. I need something i can i can hold onto. An angled handhold would be to easy to slip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ted n Ms... Others..... There is another video on U-Tube by someone who goes by the title, "1952 Jeep" . He said he had to modify the jig to get it to work for his saw. He explains how he modified it. On my computer it comes up when my video comes up. Maybe it will help.

Radar can probably post a link to this video. Not sure, but, his saw might be a De Walt.

cchoganjr
Yes Cleo i have watched both of these on youtube. My saw adj. for both angle and depth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If will notice 1952 Jeep videio he is using the saw the same way i am having to use mine inorder to set the angle to get a square cut on the top of the handhold.:eek:
 

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Can some wood worker look at the photo of the saw I used in the demonstration and tell me if it is a left hand saw or a right hand saw.

Until it was brought to my attention, I did not know they made right and left hand. All the ones I have ever seen are like the one used in the video.

View attachment 10298




cchoganjr
Hate to disagree with Rader, but...I have been using saws of both orientations for 32 years.
The pic of the Bosch saw is a left blade design which makes it a "righty saw"
A saw where the blade is a right blade design is considered a "lefty saw"
The perspective comes from line of sight during use with each particular hand.
I still find it hard to believe most people dont know what a worm drive saw is...(mostly designed as a righty saw)
 

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dje15... In the picture of the saw that i have, what is the correct way to hold that saw. Right hand on the trigger and left hand on the knob, or would you have left hand on the trigger, and right hand on knob. (Or is there any such thing as, "correct".

And, then, would the one Radar posted be held opposite?

I am sooooo confused.

cchoganjr
 

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The pic of the Bosch saw is a left blade design which makes it a "righty saw" ...
If you click the link under the photo in post #8, you will see that it is Bosch, the saw manufacturer, that is calling it a "left blade saw".

I do concede that the 'left handed saw' term was my phrase and not what the manufacturer wrote. :)

Is the saw 'left handed', or is it the saw operator that is 'left handed'? Hmmm ... :p
I write with my left hand, throw a ball with my right hand, and use my worm drive circular saw with whichever hand is most convenient.
:lpf:
.
 

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I am certainly not an expert here, but, it looks like when using a left blade design you would hold the trigger with the left hand, and when using a right blade design you hold the trigger with the right hand. Can anyone chime in here.

cchoganjr
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hate to disagree with Rader, but...I have been using saws of both orientations for 32 years.
The pic of the Bosch saw is a left blade design which makes it a "righty saw"
A saw where the blade is a right blade design is considered a "lefty saw"
The perspective comes from line of sight during use with each particular hand.
I still find it hard to believe most people dont know what a worm drive saw is...(mostly designed as a righty saw)
Cleo if this imformation is correct your saw is a lefty.
Standing behind your saw the blade is on the right. The Bosh saw the blade is on the left.
 

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dje15... In the picture of the saw that i have, what is the correct way to hold that saw. Right hand on the trigger and left hand on the knob, or would you have left hand on the trigger, and right hand on knob. (Or is there any such thing as, "correct".

And, then, would the one Radar posted be held opposite?

I am sooooo confused.


cchoganjr
Lol, your saw configuration is the saw people buy the most, even right handed people. The draw back is on a long rip, you are trying to look over the saw to see the blade if its in your right hand, increasing the danger of a kickback. If your particular saw is in your left hand it is much easier to see the blade at point of cut without the danger of a kickback.
 
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