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I noticed a 4+ acre field at work that's blooming solid bindweed. It's at that level of "recently disturbed" that'll stay bindweed for a few years if unmolested, so I have next year on my mind. I know it's a nectar producer (and the bane of my garden :rolleyes:)... anyone extracted it as a varietal? What's it like: yield, flavor?
 

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Found this in the archive, no replays in nine years it looks like... I would like to know if bees even forage on bindweed. We have acres of it around here. Anyone have any information?
 

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Never seen a bee on the stuff. Its a pretty nasty weed as you may well know.
 

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From http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/weeds/plants/field_bindweed.htm for Field Bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis):

"Faunal Associations: Long-tongued bees visit the flowers for nectar, including bumblebees and Little Carpenter bees. Bees that are specialist pollinators of members of the Bindweed family (and similar funnelform flowers from other plant families) include Melitoma taurea (Mallow Bee), Peponapis pruinosa pruinosa (Squash & Gourd Bee), and Cemolobus ipomoeae (Morning Glory Bee). The caterpillars of some moth species feed on the foliage of bindweeds, including Emmelina monodactyla (Common Plume Moth), Schizura ipomoeae (Morning Glory Prominent), and Spragueia leo (Common Spragueia). Shiny blue-green Argus beetles are often found on bindweeds, including Chelymorpha cassidea (Argus Tortoise Beetle); they feed on the foliage as well. Field Bindweed is not a preferred food source for mammalian herbivores because the foliage is mildly toxic. Furthermore, there have been reports of the rootstocks poisoning swine."

From http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/flower_insects/plants/hdg_bindweed.htm for Flower-Visiting Insects of Hedge Bindweed (Convolvulus sepium):

"Convolvulus sepium (Hedge Bindweed)
(Also referred to as Calystegia sepium; beetles feed on pollen & are non-pollinating; other insects suck nectar; observations are from Robertson)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Bombini): Bombus pensylvanica sn fq; Anthophoridae (Anthophorini): Anthophora abrupta sn; Anthophoridae (Ceratinini): Ceratina dupla dupla sn; Anthophoridae (Emphorini): Melitoma taurea sn; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Melissodes bimaculata bimaculata sn, Peponapis pruinosa pruinosa sn, Synhalonia speciosa sn fq; Megachilidae (Osmiini): Hoplitis truncata sn

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon virescens sn

Beetles
Scarabaeidae (Cetonniae): Trichiotinus piger fp np"
 
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