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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in thoughts on this article, at first it sounds like a bit of a joke, I find it a bit hard to believe. It's talking about the way the Y shape on the bottom of the cells is oriented in wild hives. I don't disbelieve the wild comb orientation, just the results and necessity of doing it in one's hives. I'm curious if anyone pays attention to the way your combs are oriented or has observed similar comb design?
http://resistantbees.com/anordnung_...4Uh7-LY_NCspu9qbvBG89dM9FBGjPV_LuNdKBkmqcCXxk
 

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Several year ago I had 20 colonies on Housel Positioning and saw no difference between the same number of colonies using random positioning. Housel himself never claimed any benefits to the colony, he just stated that he saw this comb construction in some wild colonies he inspected.
 

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It's one of those old myths that will never die.

Periodically reinforced by someone writing up on the net how they tried it and everything went so much better.

Same psychology as the person who felt so much better after taking placebo pills.
 

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I am old and have too much time on my hands and I could worry about this if I wanted without unduly taxing my time or resources. I think I will rearrange my sock drawer instead.
 

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As can be seen in this photo, my bees care nothing for Housel positioning.
Or, maybe they got into the fermenting fruit pile.

010.jpg

Alex
 

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One great super promoter of it describes how the queens eggs will fall down if the open end of the y's point down! After a while of the queens eggs falling down the workers supposedly will supercede her. :rolleyes: I guess my queens never heard about that fairy tale! I have one picture where a queen quite nicely stuck an egg directly on one of the exposed foundation wires! It didn't fall down!

Down't eat that 'arry, thath 'orth thit!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the responses, I had a few good laughs. I struggled to see how it could make a functional difference in the hive. In my observation hive my bees built some with the Y on an angle, I guess no one told them about the benefits they are missing out on.
 

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In AZ frames (no ears like on a Lang frame) in a Slovenian hive, beekeepers will intentionally turn a frame upside down sometimes, so the bees will work the bottom of the frame as well as the top. The eggs do not fall out, nor does uncapped nectar, unless you shake it out.
 

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When I was a new beekeeper I encountered this idea, too, (along with the idea of small cells). Luckily I had a very large quantity of unbroken, naturally-drawn comb from the cut-outs where my bees were collected. I thawed it out and studied and measure it extensively one winter.

My bees (and their predecessors over two decades) didn't make small cells. They made cells of all different sizes, no one size predominated. And the Housel positioning pattern was not a factor either.

So, two things I might have devoted a lot of needless effort on were scratched right off my list.

Nancy
 
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