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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought some seeds and germinated them after a cold period in the fridge. I got 3 seeds to pop and 1 has already died . I have 2 left that just have cotyledon leaves. I have them on the porch in pots with potting soil and they receive diffuse sunlight all day.

They are growing really really slowly. Any care tips ?


Thanks Brad
 

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I am clueless, I started something like 30 seeds, after several weeks about 29 sprouted. I have 3 that are looking halfway decent, the rest all died.
 

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I have 30 seeds I need to sprout, behind schedule...sounds like I should of held out for saplings...I did plant 1 1/2 pounds of sun chokes, so there should be some dearth help there...
 

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They seem to like the cooler but full sun weather better. The hot weather only slow them down
in full sun. Mine only 2" tall now but growing gradually on the ground. If you want some dearth help then
the borage (nectar and pollen) is the best so far this year. My bees cover them all day long until sunset.
Clover will be nice but I have not plant any this year. Mustard green and canola will help too in succession.
The bee tree can be stimulated by diluted compost tea and human urine if you don't have the horse urine #26.
See, all natural here. :) Cover the soil with grass clippings will help too. And some natural worm casting mixed
in with the compost soil. Make some compost tea for them in moderate amount. Too much salt will kill them at
this sensitive age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Both seedlings are still going. One has 1 set of true leaves the other 2 sets, nice deep green color, but man are they growing slow .
 

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My limited experience is that their roots need plenty of room to grow. Maybe put them in larger pots.
 

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They are big trees so it is better to plant into the ground and water them well. I don't think they
will bloom inside a small pot unless it is a big pot for growing them. I planted mine into the ground
and water them well. They are growing bigger everyday now under the full sun. I covered them with
a layer of fine sawdust to prevent evaporation. Once in a while I will give them some nitrogen fertilizer.
They are growing fast too!
 

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You guys are good, I got one seed to sprout out of a 100. Its 5' tall in the front yard now. About 3 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the replies ,they are only about about 3 inches tall , I will transplant then and see how it goes
 

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Be sure to plant it in full sun away from the busy location since your bees will be using this tree when it
flowers. Also the first few days cover it with a shade cloth so the roots can be develop. Under the hot
sun the leaves can be dry out if not shading it. Water it well too.
 

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Thanks for the replies ,they are only about about 3 inches tall , I will transplant then and see how it goes
I would not transplant them at that stage. Or, at least, do not break the soil around their roots. They are best transplanted dormant.
 

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Yes, because it is still very small the main root is not that long so it is safe to transplant with the
entire root ball with the soil attached otherwise the sun will dry out its leaves. I transplanted mine fine one month ago when
they are at 2.5".
But I have 2 trees so if one die I still have the other one. When it grows then I will not have to wait another year for this
tree to develop because the soil is better than the pot soil. Once it grows then I can care for it better than the potted tree.
Nutrients on the ground is more available where as the pot soil will accumulate salts from the fertilizer. Over all, it does not
grow that well in a pot. That is why I put them on the ground because they did not grow much. On the ground they grow faster.
So from 2.5" to almost 6" is pretty good. Don't you think so?
 

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My secrets: sow in a 2'+ deep box early spring. They will grow 2' or more in six months. Bareroot in winter and plant out.
Send me $$$ for these secrets. Paypal to: [email protected]
My beds this year:


My product:
 

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Why yours are all dead now?
Don't you know how to take care of them? Must bee the drought we are
having, huh. Don't worry, I got that cover too.
I will give you my secret for taking care of them for "FREE."
But it might not bee as good as odfrank's. Still good though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well I set my containers out in the garden with 12 plus hours and sun, and well nothing, have not grown 1/2 in 2 weeks
 

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Liquid chemical fertilizer like Miracle grow will help with any nutrient deficiency. Or manure tea. Which Charlie should have used as he has plenty.
 

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When planting tree seeds try to put them in the pot you want them in for a few months, so a 1 gallon nursery pot or bigger. Or, go right into the ground. It's better nto to transplant young seedlings until they're well established and a bit woody - the winter after you start the seeds.

I've starting anything from maple trees to pine trees but placing the seeds in posts full of half compost and half sand and making sure they got 6 hours of morning sun and then shade the rest of the day. My plants are in pots on the East tisde of my house. Bright warm morning sun and then around 1 the shade starts to shift over them as the sun passes over my house and they don't burn up in the hottest part of the day.

How big are your pots? If you need to, move them to something bigger, even though I said it's better not too. It's better to start them in something big so you don't have to move them, but move them if they need the space - they will just stop growing and eventually die if the pot is too small - go ahead and move them. Water every day, don't miss a day, and water well. Remember, in a pot all of that water drains out and the plant is left to wait until the next time you water! Compost helps with that because it absorbs and retains more moisture. If you are going to move them - half sand or soil from your own place, half compost. Skip the shortlived potting soil.

Whenever possible, avoid synthetic fertalizers (like miracle grow). It's bad for your soil and not great for the plants. Adding compost to your pot when you plant is best. Afterwards, compost tea or worm tea *basically, the compost or worm excreiment soaked in warm water out in the sun like you would regular tea, then the "dirty" water used to water your pots* works really well.

You can actually distrub roots quite a bit and have a very succeful transplant rate. But that takes some practice. So, try not to distrub the roots and just move the whole clump in your pot if you transplant them into a bigger pot or the ground. Let it dry out just enough to make a clump you can handle. Freshly watered potting soil will crumble apart when you try to take it out of the pot.
 

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I don't like the chemical fertilizers either. They are full of salts that will burn your young tree.
Try the organic way is better for me. If you are healthy then save some urine or buy the compost
at the store for the nitrogen. If I were you I would put them into the ground and shade them for
a few days. Then they can take the full sun once established. I transplanted mine into the ground
at 2" or so. Now they are 6" and growing fast cuz I put my urine for the nitrogen plus kelp meal solution all mixed in
a 5 gal bucket to water them weekly. If you find that the urine is gross then use the kelp meal, it is organic anyways.
They will not grow much inside a small pot cuz the main root needs lot of space to grow deep into the soil. A small
pot will restrict its growth. Then in the winter time cover them after their leaves fall off just like you're covering your
bee hives to overwinter them. Try to transplant 1 to compare them in a few weeks. You still have the time to do so.
 

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I don't like the chemical fertilizers either. They are full of salts that will burn your young tree.
Try the organic way is better for me. If you are healthy then save some urine or buy the compost
at the store for the nitrogen. If I were you I would put them into the ground and shade them for
a few days. Then they can take the full sun once established. I transplanted mine into the ground
at 2" or so. Now they are 6" and growing fast cuz I put my urine for the nitrogen plus kelp meal solution all mixed in
a 5 gal bucket to water them weekly. If you find that the urine is gross then use the kelp meal, it is organic anyways.
They will not grow much inside a small pot cuz the main root needs lot of space to grow deep into the soil. A small
pot will restrict its growth. Then in the winter time cover them after their leaves fall off just like you're covering your
bee hives to overwinter them. Try to transplant 1 to compare them in a few weeks. You still have the time to do so.
All nutrients are salt. Put fresh manure on a seedling and the osmotic pressure will dehydrate it just as well. Pure urine is a lot more saline than what miracle grow tells you to dilute their fertilizers t.

I've not read of any reliable source that synthetic fertilizers are bad for soil. If you use nothing but that, and never apply any soil amendments, then yes, your soil will likely deteriorate. But that's not because the fertilizers you use are bad for the soil, but because your fertilization program is incomplete.

I personally tend to favor a mix of both. Organic fertilizers are too limited in scope and it is often impossible to get the proper levels of required nutrients. 5-1-1 is *not* an appropriate all-around fertilizer. In a house pot it may not be a big deal, but outside, a good proportion of that nitrogen will not be absorbed and will pollute.

Manure is also not always adequate to apply. Fresh manure applied on leaf greens have caused E. coli and global recalls in the past. Poo is poo. Composted manure should not have this problem, but compost is also very low in nutrient levels. A large amount of organic matter, as with compost, will also tend to immobilize the nutrients you put in your soil, which will thus not be available for your plant's growth.

In the end, though, the number one most important factor is not the fertility of the soil, but the quantity of soil. A plant will never grow big and healthy in a small pot. Trees need a lot of space for the roots to grow.
 
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