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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These are a possible replacement for the metal screen used in whatever flavour of screened bottom board you may use. If you use solid bottom boards then I guess this is not for you. The screen consists of parallel V shaped bars spaced to prevent passage by bees. Among possible advantages are that the inverted V shaped, smooth bars may shed detritus more readily and that the underside may make it more difficult for the mobile component of the detritus, or even interlopers from elsewhere, to pass back into the hive.

That's the theory, does anyone have practical experience?

If you need the company perspective it is here.
 

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5 ,8 ,10 frame, and long Lang
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looks to be a slatted rack, screen combo.

the verbiage IMO is to attempt to scare the unwitting into a purchase.

like this one "Remove the hazardous plain board "
hazardous??

I do like the slatted rack, and I do feel a screen on the whole bottom is too much air flow so in theory the product may work better.
I also am not a fan of plastic in my hives so none starter for me.

put them on 1/2 your hives and do a compare, keep notes and let us know, :)

GG
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
put them on 1/2 your hives and do a compare, keep notes and let us know, :)
Thanks GG, it may come to that, the only problem is that half my hives is not a very large number, the statistics will be awful. :) I am interested in any other experiences.

The language on the site is what gave me pause as well. The idea looks good, trying to get anything that is not dry and granular through a wire screen is always a task and this structure and material may pass hive trash more easily. To be fair the language is probably just over enthusiasm from a small inventor but he would do well to provide some better supporting information.

Just for consistency, my idea of a slatted rack is one where the gaps between slats is large enough for bees to pass. Is that consistent with your understanding?

Selwyn
 

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Thanks GG, it may come to that, the only problem is that half my hives is not a very large number, the statistics will be awful. :) I am interested in any other experiences.

The language on the site is what gave me pause as well. The idea looks good, trying to get anything that is not dry and granular through a wire screen is always a task and this structure and material may pass hive trash more easily. To be fair the language is probably just over enthusiasm from a small inventor but he would do well to provide some better supporting information.

Just for consistency, my idea of a slatted rack is one where the gaps between slats is large enough for bees to pass. Is that consistent with your understanding?

Selwyn
yes the gap allows the bees to pass. IF i built mine which is on the to do list ( i would need 50 or so) I would put a 3/4 inch board on edge centered where the frame is so 10 for a 10 frame and 8 for the 8 frame. as the frames are 1.x the opening should be 1/2 inch + between,
I would also set my table saw on a 45 and take the corners off the top so there is not a 3/4 shelf but a point to assist debris falling better. 2 to 3 inch depth would likely be enough, it would be what the math of good wood use works out to. Frame it and put in a drawer to inspect/remove the debris. Have a lot on the plate now so perhaps this winters project.

do you have a "price" on these bluebee devices? at some point good idea or not,,, making some could be easier/cheaper.

GG
 

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yes the gap allows the bees to pass. IF i built mine which is on the to do list ( i would need 50 or so) I would put a 3/4 inch board on edge centered where the frame is so 10 for a 10 frame and 8 for the 8 frame. as the frames are 1.x the opening should be 1/2 inch + between,
I would also set my table saw on a 45 and take the corners off the top so there is not a 3/4 shelf but a point to assist debris falling better. 2 to 3 inch depth would likely be enough, it would be what the math of good wood use works out to. Frame it and put in a drawer to inspect/remove the debris. Have a lot on the plate now so perhaps this winters project.

do you have a "price" on these bluebee devices? at some point good idea or not,,, making some could be easier/cheaper.

GG
I purchase a few years ago.
They are not cheap - about Aus $ 20 plus postage.
I don't like the plastic and I can't say that the sceens have been an improvement
I'm in the subtropics - we don't get cold winters.
Don't forget that you need to build a frame to fit the screen
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
GG. They are still just under A$20 for the 10 frame.

Max2. If you have not found an improvement I'm wondering what are you comparing to, wire screens, no screens?
 
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