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That's not what us experienced guys heard. Treatment free is a path of natural selection that requires all your weak colonies (99% listed by another poster) to die while you raise queens from the survivors. Since you're at the point where multiple colonies are superseding it's likely they'll soon start collapsing as the mites have reached such high levels. It's hard to recover a hive once they get past a certain point. I've had hives go from 3 deeps full of bees to dead in two weeks from mites. Keep in mind, it's not the mites that necessarily kill them, it's the diseases they introduce.

All I'm suggesting - instead of taking an extremist approach, take a scientific one. Without knowing your mite loads it's keeping by luck, not skill. Get a count, treat the bees that need it and breed the ones that don't. Since you wanted to make a business out of it, you'll soon realize the practicality of my approach.

You're hives may currently be fine, but could they better, stronger, and more productive with just a little help? Absolutely.

Regardless, I wish you good luck. I think we've answered your original question and although you may not like the answer, it's yours to do with what you wish.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I specifically said I'm not going to let a hive die out without doing anything. I don't doubt there are mites but I also watched my other colonies that superseded continue to thrive and I've read enough to know that the reasons bees do things can't always be understood. Thanks for your input.
 
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