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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picture this: you have 2 strong hives. Each had tons of pollen coming in. Three weeks ago, you split each (can't see eggs whether they're present or not, and could never find a queen, regardless; flying blind). Two of the colonies never had pollen coming in since the splitting, and the 2 others had pollen-delivery end fast. None in a week or so.

So .... what to do about this? Maybe buy a queen, start a nuc with her and try to shore up the other hives with fresh brood in hopes they can be salvaged? Add a new queen to 1 of the mother hives and see what happens? :s

Any guidance on this would be nice; anecdotes, good too.

Mitch
 

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Hmm, Im assuming you have mature drones flying? If not buy some queens.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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There are definitely drones flying in NC. My hives are full of them in VA. I would do nothing yet. A walkaway split takes about 30 days before you have a laying queen. The other hives, not so sure why pollen collection would apparently stop. If it has been three weeks, check the the two parent hives for larvae or capped brood. If you have it, nothing to worry about. If the frames are devoid of new brood, look for opened queen cells. You may have inadvertantly moved the queen. Too early to think about buying new queens.
 

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There are definitely drones flying in NC. My hives are full of them in VA. I would do nothing yet. A walkaway split takes about 30 days before you have a laying queen. The other hives, not so sure why pollen collection would apparently stop. If it has been three weeks, check the the two parent hives for larvae or capped brood. If you have it, nothing to worry about. If the frames are devoid of new brood, look for opened queen cells. You may have inadvertantly moved the queen. Too early to think about buying new queens.
I am assuming he had the correct age larva for the bees to make a queen, and it doesnt sound right to me to have a split not forage at all. He didnt mention how close these splits are so they could have flown back, not sure. I dont have drones flying yet here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am assuming he had the correct age larva for the bees to make a queen, and it doesnt sound right to me to have a split not forage at all. He didnt mention how close these splits are so they could have flown back, not sure. I dont have drones flying yet here.
when I checked the splits and mother hives several days ago, all still had lots of bees present. I'm sure some in the splits went "home" (the hives are on 2 stands, located only a few feet from each other), but not en masse .....
I looked at 1 of the splits yesterday, and did finally see a couple of bees bringing in some pollen. One swallow doesn't make a spring, though.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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When keeping splits in the same yard, you loose almost all the forager aged bees back to the parent hive. It takes a week or two for some of the nurse bees to "graduate" to forager status, hence no pollen for a period of time. It is a good sign that you are seeing some pollen gathering now. It is on schedule. I suspect the bees are telling you that you now have a mated queen. Give them a week or two and then check for brood. Normally I would say wait a week and look for eggs, but if you can't see them, hypothetically, then capped brood is a sure indicator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When keeping splits in the same yard, you loose almost all the forager aged bees back to the parent hive. It takes a week or two for some of the nurse bees to "graduate" to forager status, hence no pollen for a period of time. It is a good sign that you are seeing some pollen gathering now. It is on schedule. I suspect the bees are telling you that you now have a mated queen. Give them a week or two and then check for brood. Normally I would say wait a week and look for eggs, but if you can't see them, hypothetically, then capped brood is a sure indicator.
Obrigado as always,JW; kinda reassuring. I think I'm getting way too wanting-things-done-and-done-now .... "**** bees! Can't they do anything right?!".
 

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Obrigado as always,JW; kinda reassuring. I think I'm getting way too wanting-things-done-and-done-now .... "**** bees! Can't they do anything right?!".
You work for the bees, they don't work for you.
clyderoad
 
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