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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all, not one to be uberalarmist, but there is a related oil spill story floating around out there which sounds like a potential doomsday scenario on top of the horrific gulf oil tragedy. Check this link for interest's sake, and even if you conclude it is far fetched, the sources dubious etc. have a think about what even the mildest manifestation of this plausible scenario might mean for us beekeepers. Any opinions? Oh here's the link: http://www.eutimes.net/2010/05/toxic-oil-spill-rains-warned-could-destroy-north-america/
 

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This better stay STRICTLY on the topic of beekeeping or it will disappear faster than you can say "off topic".
 

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Yes Barry, that is the point. There are many doomsday forum discussions out there, not into that. I am most concerned with what the impact on beekeeping would be based on one the premises in the report. I am not interested in post-apocalyptic discussion - focused on what could be a big hit on beekeepers on a large scale if, as I stated, the mildest version of this plausible sounding event were to take place.
 

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It means we do business as usual. If bees start dying off, more CCD, deformed bees, etc, we just try to protect what we have and pray that scientists can figure out a way to help us keep our bees alive and viable.

I will not worry about it. I will pray about it. There is nothing I can do otherwise without giving me ulcers.
 

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Yeah, I agree with USCBeeMan, I think I will keep my concerns about my bees to starvation, mites and nosema for the moment. Not to say it couldnt happen, just not worth worrying about.
 

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Just something to think about, there are bacteria that can actually digest the toxic oil sludge that washes up on shore. I agree that dispersants are nasty chemicals and don't think they should be used at that depth or in that volume.

This isn't a site I'd rely on but I'm referencing it only because I already know that during the Exxon spill bacterial clean ups were used, which I heard from my dad (worked for Exxon during that time).

http://www.accessexcellence.org/RC/AB/BA/Cleaning_Up_Wastes.php

"Following the major oil spill in Alaska's Prince William Sound, the Environmental Protection Agency brought in natural oil-eating bacteria to help clean up the mess. Follow-up studies suggest that the microbes did as good a job in cleaning up soiled beaches as high-pressure hoses and detergents could have done. "It was almost as if we had brought in fresh rock," stated the EPA's project manager after visiting the site."

My guess is that we'll see degraded compounds from this stuff show up in fresh water in the Gulf Coast States, but our bees are already exposed to toxic chemicals all the time. Just add it to the list.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It means we do business as usual. If bees start dying off, more CCD, deformed bees, etc, we just try to protect what we have and pray that scientists can figure out a way to help us keep our bees alive and viable.

I will not worry about it. I will pray about it. There is nothing I can do otherwise without giving me ulcers.
Yes I agree we have too much to worry about already. I just threw this out there as something to be mindful of, if toxic rain becomes an issue then BP may stand for Beekeeper's Pension along with the shrimpers, etc. and all the other people devastated by this. Don't mean to be alarmist or anything, just trying to keep an eye on what else can pop up for the industry. We don't need more ulcers either!
 
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