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I am going Foundationless on Medium Frames ( Kelley's ), in doing so, does each EMPTY frame need to be BETWEEN DRAWN OUT frames or will the Girls draw out multiple empty frames side by side. I hope someone can enlighten me on this "Technique". :scratch:

I apologize for asking, I know there are other threads on the same subject, however the search for this specific question has failed me :eek:

Thank You :)
 

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There are a couple thoughts to this and they are also based on new package vs. established hive.

1) on a new package, you can go with all foundationless, giving them a small guide to start with, either popsicle sticks, or foundation starter strips.

2) on an established hive, I've seen it mostly recommended to sandwich them between fully formed frames.

In both cases, it is very important that the hive is leveled.
 

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I usually start mine between frames containing capped brood but this is a cut and paste off Michael Bush's website:

Question:

You mean I can just put a box of empty frames on the hive?

Answer:

No. The bees need some kind of guide.

Question:

What is a comb guide?

Answer:

It can be any of several things. You can use an empty frame with nothing added IF you have a drawn brood comb on each side as the brood comb will act as a guide. You can put popsicle sticks in the groove to make a sort of wooden strip, or cut a piece of wood to make a wood starter strip. You can turn the wedge on end and glue it in. You can cut a triangular piece and put on the bottom of the top bar. You can buy chamfer molding and cut it to fit and put it on the bottom of the top bar. You can cut the top bars on a bevel. You can make a sheet of empty wax and cut it into 3/4" wide strips and put in the groove of the top bar and wax it in. You can cut strips of regular foundation into 3/4" wide strips and wax that in the groove or nail it with the cleat. If the frame already had comb in it, you can just leave the top row of cells on the top bar for a guide. Any of these work fine.
 

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2) on an established hive, I've seen it mostly recommended to sandwich them between fully formed frames.
Speaking from experience, make sure it is two brood frames. Last year I put a foundationless frame between two frames of pollen and honey, and the bees proceeded to add height to the existing comb on each side, and extended it out into the space of the other frame. When I lifted out the adjacent frame, it ripped open the honey comb and I had some mad bees... :no:
 

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You absolutely do not have to sandwich them between drawn frames. In the brood chamber, they will draw drone if they don't have any. Just move it to the outside and the rest will be worker. In honey supers, I commonly slap on full supers of empty frames without problems as long as there is a flow. I go back and nine frame them after they have been largely drawn out.
 
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