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been talking about this in other threads for months. Vespa Mandarinia, the Asian Giant Hornet as it is commonly called. Guess thats not a dramatic enough headline for some outfits, so now they want to calll it the 'murder hornet' to make a clickbait headline.

If you dig into the threads here on beesource there is a fair amount already on this insect. The real short version. I have met with the folks in Nanaimo that found and destroyed a nest last fall. There have been a couple more confirmed sightings since on the mainland near the BC / Washington border. There is worry that there is another nest established somewhere on the mainland.
 

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Yeah, Grozzie, read the epic accounts last year. Those Nanaimo folks were heroes.
Hope the Washington state folks are up to the challenge! Concerned about the Sumas Prairie area, hope the Valley Beeks are paying attention.
Grim news, indeed. Vigilance totally required.
Brian
 

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Yeah, Grozzie, read the epic accounts last year. Those Nanaimo folks were heroes.
Hope the Washington state folks are up to the challenge! Concerned about the Sumas Prairie area, hope the Valley Beeks are paying attention.
Grim news, indeed. Vigilance totally required.
Brian
I met with the Nanaimo folks a few days after they did the erradication. I was still working as the BCHPA rep at the time, so went to Nanaimo for a meeting a few days later. They had some very interesting show and tell stuff for us to see, and to say it was enlightening was an understatement. They showed one comb, it had brood in it, the brood was wiggling. For perspective, it had been out of the nest for a few days, and spent some time in the freezer before coming to that meeting.

I know here on the island everybody is going to be keeping an eye out for these things. Not really happy about the new 'Murder Hornets' clickbait headlines. The species was confirmed in Nanaimo when a observant beekeeper caught one and forwarded it to the provincial apiarist. Once word was out in the papers, there were a lot of reports of more sightings, most turned out to be plain old wasps. It is that time of the year here, wasp queens are out, so with this new line of 'murder hornet' clickbait in the news, going to be lots of calls now. Provincial apiarist will have to follow up on every one of them, so our bee inspectors will be busy chasing false alarms on Giant Asian Hornets for a while. In the meantime, pretty much all of the beekeepers on Vancouver Island have seen them during various meeting show and tell sessions, they had plenty of samples and a couple encased in acrylic after the nest was exterminated. We will be watching carefully for them, and start beelining if we see any.
 

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Wouldn't it be neat if these "murder hornets" would target Africanized Bees and leave us alone. Keep those bad boys up North, our regular hornets and Yellow Jackets are bad enough.
 

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Is there information available on screens that can keep the Asian hornet out of beehives? I installed some bottom screens today and used aluminum fine-meshed screens from the local building supply (window screens I guess). But now I wonder whether the hornets can cut through that. I live in the next state over from where they were discovered in WA. I'll add some steel screens, but it would be nice to know what minimum mesh hole size should be used to keep them out.

Holger
 

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Holger,

From reading up last year when this was originally reported, I don't think screens are considered to be very effective. If the bees want to fly they've got to get past the hornets. And our bees tend to dispatch one or two guards at a time to confront the hornets (which doesn't end well), and the attrition of bees eventually makes the colony weak enough that the hornets can waltz right in. But even with a screen in place, the colony can't forage or do cleansing flights without going through the hornets. On the other hand, Asian honey bees deal with the hornets more effectively by balling them instead of trying to take them on in small numbers. Folks can correct me if I'm remembering this wrong.

For the record, I hate the "murder hornet" moniker...I sure hope beekeepers will lead the way in NOT using it.
 

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Thanks, Bee Arthur! From what I read, Japanese beekeepers have both Asian and European bees, where the European bees haven't "learned" the balling trick yet. How are the Japanese beekeepers protecting their European beehives? Have they tried screens that keep the larger predators out? Maybe the European bees can sense the fact the attackers actually can't get in?

Holger,For the record, I hate the "murder hornet" moniker...I sure hope beekeepers will lead the way in NOT using it.
Hey, I didn't use that term. :rolleyes:
 
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