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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
will leaving the cut out comb in yard for bee to get honey off of cause them to be more aggressive. I put a tub of honey covered comb I couldn't get into hive from wall removal. about 40 - 50 lbs of comb honey and drone cells .all my hive are bumping me and stinging my blue dog but not my blond one. the hive I pull from wall is still pissed off quite a bit. you can smell pheromone all around new hive, is this pissing my other hives off to.
 

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Maybe wash your bee suit and get the pheromone off as much as possible. When they greet you at the truck door you know something not right.
 

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After a major dislocation like a cutout, the bees are going to stay riled up for several days. Stay away for five days and see if that doesn't make a big difference. Washing the suit would be good too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
After a major dislocation like a cutout, the bees are going to stay riled up for several days. Stay away for five days and see if that doesn't make a big difference. Washing the suit would be good too.

well I pick up all the comb, my bee vacuum (it had abunch of bee hanging on inside so I left it out there ),and washed everything 2 times. that seemed to make them a little bit less flighty they where comeing 150' to try and get me before. so well see.

I asked in another post be why mostly drone brood all comb was back filled bunch of queen cells like 30 or 40 of them some hatched some just larvae. found three queens all looked pretty small.( I just sucked them up too. )
 

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Last summer when my bees were cut out of my barns I was advised to leave the excess comb (beyond what we tied-in) out for the bees to clean out. It created a honey riot with angry bees, drowning bees, hopelessly stuck to the honey-comb bees and (probably) every bee within flying distance fighting for chance at the spoils. I only put up with it for a day or so (being a newbie I had no idea what to expect or what was normal.) When I got fed up enough to pick up every scrap of it and stow it away out of the bees' reach, the bees began calming down and getting adjusted to their new digs. It helped that a few hours after I did this we had a heavy rain which washed away the last vestiges of it.

Wet supers after extraction are one thing, but full, oozing comb chunks are too much of good thing. Nearly a year later I am now feeding them the chunks, but inside the hive on top of the top bars. This keeps things under control and results in no robbing nonsense. I've just kept my winter feeding rim on and every few days I pop in a new chunk, retrieve the last one (and scrape off the burr comb they've built on it). If I was interested I suppose I could do a crush and strain and retrieve the honey, but I'd rather the bees had it and this is the easy way to get that done. I kept it stored in my freezer in huge disposable aluminum turkey roaster trays.

Enj.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yup it had hundreds of dead bees on it so I burned it. after I got rid of it the cloud of bees went away.
 

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>will leaving the cut out comb in yard for bee to get honey off of cause them to be more aggressive. I put a tub of honey covered comb

Sometimes it sets off a feeding frenzy and fighting and that can cause them to become aggressive. Sometimes the feeding frenzy turns into a robbing frenzy and that is even more likely to make them aggressive.
 
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