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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks,
I've been wondering, has anyone tried to set up an empty hive in their backyard with bee pheromone and capatured a swarm by scouts finding the hive and bringing the swarm to it. This situation has to be not in an apiary (no cheating).:no:
Pete
 

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my dad has an empty five frame nuc in his backyard, foundationless frames, Dadant nasanov swarm lure installed and 10 miles from any beeyard. Caught 8 swarms in 6 weeks last year in his backyard. Already caught one this year. Im sure there are a few hobbyists within a few miles, but no commercial or sideliner sized yards, its all residential for miles around.
 

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Hi Pete, yes I have caught a couple swarms. I setup a nuc with some old drawn comb in it and a few drops of lemon grass oil. One at the entrance and a couple at the very back of the nuc. It really works well. I placed the nuc in a tree about 8 feet up. Seems to work.
 

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I have several traps around the neighborhood. Cought a swam in my front yard trap. It sits 8 feet up in a tree in the wood and some girls have moved in.

Mine are 5 frame boxes with 1 frame of old comb and some lemon grass oil on a cotton ball on top of the frames.

So too answer your question yes Traps work. Just not predictably. The more you put out the more chances you have.
 

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Nature bee, now thats doing some thinking on your traps! Very cool :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Thanks for all the great answers however I think some are missing the point. I have an new empty hive but no bees, I just want to set the 10 frame hive at its final resting place with some lure in it in the backyard ( not up in a tree) and see if I can get some takers. As you can see I'm new at this, started too late and am not confident enough to try a cut out or capture. I am suppose to get a established hive in a couple of weeks but I just would like to try this for a backup if my connection doesn't come thru. Neebes, have such strange ideas!!!:D
Pete
 

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Pete,
My experience with trapping swarms is that swarm traps set
up at least 6 feet, entrance facing south or SW, lure or lemon
grass oil used, partially sunny location, near to some type
of structure or large tree (which tend to attract scouts), -have
about a 50% success rate in an area where there are competing
voids available.

I would suspect a hive sitting on the ground in the beeyard, with
lure to have a success rate lower than 50%. However, I've seen
swarms take up residence in empty bee gums which I have sitting in the
yard, and also the ocasional swarm entering and empty hive or
stack of supers sitting on the ground, so your idea of luring a swarm
to an empty hive in the beeyard is certainly a good one, and
worthy of a try.

I have the greatest success with swarms inhabiting old bee
equipment and hives which I have sitting near to extracting
areas or near to places where I have feeding stations established
for the purpose of obtaining coordinates on feral bee lines. In fact,
I keep a swarm trap near to where I extract due to all the scouts
that know and visit this area, and having investigated, are well aware
of the traps presence. If storing supers outside my extracting area,
I purposely leave a convenient entrance for scouts which may be
searching voids in the area.

Why is success higher in foraging areas?,,,,
Swarm scouts are former foragers, so traps near to foraging
locations will have a higher success rate over those not
near to these area. Ribbands (1953) theorized; 'since scout
bees are usually established foragers, their searching may be
guided by previous experience.'

Lindauer (1955); 'Some. . .of the old, marked
bees came back occasionally to [my] feeding table, but no longer
as forager bees; they sipped only briefly at the sugar water,
but they did not fly back immediately to the hive. Rather they
began working in the neighborhood in a strange way: they sought
nearby for dark holes and cracks, crawled into mouse holes in the
ground and into deep cracks in the bark of trees, and finally
inspected [my] two empty nesting boxes. There was no doubt
about it: these former forager bees had become house-hunting bees.'

Best Wishes,
Joe
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/HistoricalHoneybeeArticles/
-Two men were seen a short time since
chasing a swarm of bees across the fields
towards the woods. The bees discovered
they were pursued and took the first tree
with a hole in it. An armistice was then
agreed to for three months.
- Wisconsin, July 6, 1871
 
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