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And of course NO One wants to Talk about it 馃檮
What's sad is that in Lexington there is a well known local Beek that's also , I think, head of a Bee club..... Nothing from her about it that I can see/read FB or other sites they are on.
that's the part that makes me suspect. Around here they notify everyone that is registered near where an outbreak is. Everyone uses the information available using the beekeeper network to eventually figure out who's yards/bees they were and yet not a peep on any of the websites or beekeepers involved. Never takes to long to narrow down as most beeks know the other beeks in their area's.
 

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Alabama has a "No Comb" law, meaning that neither comb nor used equipment may be brought into the State. Nucs from neighboring states cannot be brought into Alabama for sale. Queens and packages may. Migratory beekeepers can apply for permits to travel through the state.

This law is frequently debated and discussed at beekeeper meetings and in beekeeping circles in our state. It has recently been brought back up by a few commercial beekeepers that would like to see the law abolished.

Do other states have No Comb laws? Alabama has very few, if any, reported AFB cases annually. I don't know if the law has anything to do with low incidents of AFB or not.
I didn't know that. I have a friend near Jasper TN (probably 10 miles from AL) that told me a while back he wouldn't dare move any across the line despite massive canola property he had access to. I didn't know why he was reluctant. I assume most states have something where an inspector can certify them as safe to travel. Now I know.

In TN, you can't sell used bee equipment without live bees residing in it. I see empty hives advertised now and then, usually by hobbyists, and these could be a few dead-outs from mites or what not. Depending on the time of year (not yet infested with SHB or moths) it seems like a good way to get into bees at a discount. However, I'm a bit freakish about folks bringing anything to my yard. Only new equipment comes in, as it's not worth the .01% risk of something infectious. I recently gave someone a nuc and he brought back a new EZ Nuc box with new frames/foundations. I had told him no need, but he assured me they had been in his garage, closed up and unused. Otherwise I would not have taken them.

Last year I was taking a zoom class and Mike Studer (TN state apiarist) said that they had found 4-5 cases on AFB in 2019 (last year they had complete data on). This is in a state with 7200 registered beeks managing 42,000 hives, each of which is inspected every year. I really didn't want to register and get involved with the whole process initially, but the inspectors are beeks and it's hard to argue with the results. Jay Heselschwerdt (regional inspector) usually does my inspection as he is one of only 2-3 (I think) in the state that can certify queen breeders. This spring I told him he would not have to burn/destroy a hive of mine. If I discovered AFB, I would immediately take action. He said to call him and he would be here the same day. Since he lives over 3 hours away, this tells me they are serious.

Random note on inspections; I have found having an expert set of eyes looking over the hives once a year to be helpful. In TN, they are only concerned with AFB and Africanized. Anything else they will walk you through. Also, if they must destroy a hive in a yard you've registered, they reimburse you. I think it went from $90 to $200 this year. Other incentives for registration is a waiver of liability for suits from stings.
 

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Nice feedback, @Oldtimer.

Your feedback made me curious, so I did a little digging around and found this contemporary study which attempts to answer this question - interesting stuff:

Here is one of the parents -

Park OW. Disease resistance and American foulbrood. Am Bee J. 1936;74:12鈥4
 

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JL your link was blocked?
I need to find the document in my journal accounts. I'll refresh the link when I can. TLDR, even though the advice on handling AFB was bad, he wasn't completely wrong about the resistance mechanisms...

USDA-ARS was on Two Bees in a Podcast talking about this very issue in episode 118. @Litsinger posted it somewhere the other day - can't remember where though.
 

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@Litsinger posted it somewhere the other day - can't remember where though.
Here it is for those interested- they said it hasn't shown as much promise with EFB however...

Here is a really fascinating interview with Dr. Michael D. Simone-Finstrom of the USDA-ARS on the subject of transgenerational immune priming- the idea that queens and drones can confer viral resistance or tolerance on to their offspring:
 

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I need to find the document in my journal accounts. I'll refresh the link when I can.
I'm getting a little better at searching archive.org- see the attached.

I've also attached research from Dr. Kefuss which outlines the next generation of research on this subject.

But then there is this:

 

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... fixing a trait via recessive genes ...
My apologies- I am mixing metaphors. The Recessive Markers link has an article describing why controlled crosses were so important in experimental studies prior to the availability of genetic testing - and then finishes with a cautionary tale about linebreeding when attempting to fix traits, using the referenced AFB resistance studies as an example.
 
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