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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went out to feed some of the bees today, as I was only putting on a feeder pail I did not take the smoker and left the jacket & gloves in the truck.
On the first hive the bees came out with a temper, two of them nailed me on the inside elbow on my right arm. I walked over to the truck, removed the stingers and put my jacket on. We got the feed put on all four hives anf walked back to the truck, as I took the jacket off my feet and scalp started to itch pretty bad. I told Anna I may be having a reaction but was not sure, we headed back home and only got about a block when I told Anna we would be stopping in at the local fire station, everypart of my body itched and my lips were swelling up (ok to breath). We got to the station maybe 10 minutes after getting stung, they took one look at me and said they were taking me in. At the hospital they continued with the IV drip and added steroids and an anti inflamatory plus I got a shot to the stomache. They kept me under observation for three hours then let me leave. I have a perscription to get in the morning. The Dr said next time I get stung dont wait just go ahead and use the Epi pen. Up until tonight I have never had more than a local reaction to a sting. The wife thinks I am nuts but I am not giving up on the bees.
 

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I don't think you have to give up your bees. Even people with allergies to honeybee venom are able to participate in Bee Venom Therapy after undergoing a desensitization procedure. It takes about two weeks.

While you are allergic, if you get stung use that epi pen, take the Benedryll and get to the ER asap. An epi pen does not mean you can skip the ER. It just buys you more time. Check out the apitherapy forum.
 

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Old english I am sorry for hearing this news. This a horrible thing that happened to you. But we may all learn from it. when we get stung each time its like dropping a coin in the slot machine. when one the one time you get to hit jack pot! It is a anaflactic recation. not good, thats why I tell people and new people limit the amout of stings you get wear a full suit glove and all. that will help. and squishing one or two bees over getting stung is a little price to pay. but if you saw me today with just my vail and hat on and get stung. I know the thought it will just take me a second nothing to worry about. So Old English I wish you well keep that epi pen close and enjoy your bees.
 

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Even people with allergies to honeybee venom are able to participate in Bee Venom Therapy after undergoing a desensitization procedure. It takes about two weeks..
Desensitization takes 2 years, not 2 weeks. I have been doing it for over a year for large local reactions. I highly recommend it- it has made a huge difference in my reaction to stings. I also recommend that you get tested at an allergist. Are you on any beta blockers? That too can affect your reaction to stings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
An abdominal injection?
Please explain.
Ernie
All the meds they gave me were introduced through an IV drip, except one which was injected straight into the stomache (short needle and it did not hurt). I was a little out of it so I dont remember what they said it was.
I know somebody that if they get stung will be unconcious within 20 seconds, they were getting the Desensitization treatment which allowed them to stay in the bees but then they got divorced and with no medical had to drop the treatment, it only took about a month to undo over a year of treatment and now she is getting out of the bees.

I dont mind suiting up for all the bee work, but I will miss just sitting next to the hives with a beer in hand just watching them come and go.
 

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more that likely it was a subcutaneous injection of Epinepherine. It can give given subcutaneoulsy or intramuscular. The belly usually has a good layer of fat tissue to make it a good subq site.
 

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Desensitization takes 2 years, not 2 weeks. I have been doing it for over a year for large local reactions. I highly recommend it- it has made a huge difference in my reaction to stings. I also recommend that you get tested at an allergist. Are you on any beta blockers? That too can affect your reaction to stings.
Sorry to hear about your bad sting reaction but this info is helpful for everyone here on the forum. I didn't know that you could have a bad reaction if you had no past problems. I always wear at least a vail and long pants & shirt. Gloves most of the time. Never had a reaction like you suffered and I have stung hundreds of times by wasps and bees.

I am on beta blockers. I assume this makes the reaction worst? Thanks all for sharing your knowledge. I'll be more careful and start wearing my new jacket and gloves all the time.
 

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Oldenglish,

Sorry to hear about your experience but I do want to commend you for wisdom and quick thinking. Stopping at the local fire department was excellent thinking on your part.

Hope your recovery is quick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The belly usually has a good layer of fat tissue to make it a good subq site.
No doubts there, I have a good layer of belly fat, glad it was good for something.:)
The Dr said sting reactions are like playing slot machines, each sting is the quarter to play, if you get unlucky you will get a severe reaction. Also sounded like it is not the kinda thing that will only happen once, as soon as you get your first bad reaction you are on that ride for life (subject to treatment) I will be getting with my Dr here soon to ask some questions about it.
 

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Did they have the lights and sirens going?
 

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I mentioned two weeks for the desensitization process as that is what I read. My source is the book "How Well Are You Willing to Bee?" by Pat Wagner (aka The Bee Lady). See page 62. Pat says she learned that process from Charles Mraz who treated people for 60 years using bee venom therapy.

I suppose the BVT apitherapists may do it differently than the medical community. Perhaps both 2 weeks and 2 years are correct depending on how it is done and who does it.

Also, my understanding is that the beta blockers interfere with the treatment in case of allergic reaction. It reduces the benefit of the epi pen and the Benedryll when it is administered. My apitherapist said once it is determined that I am not allergic that I can take the beta blocker while undergoing BVT.

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Disclaimer: I am not a doctor. Anyone practicing Bee Venom Therapy should proceed at their own risk.
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Did they have the lights and sirens going?
It was actually 2 ambulances, the first did not have a medic so they used the lights and siren as we went to join up with the second ambulance which I was transfered to. Anna my 15 yr daughter got to sit in the front, I asked her if she enjoyed it, she said hell no I was scared stiff (she used more colorfull words) they were doing 75 and driving like a nut.
The second one may have had the lights on but no siren
 

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Let me add this. The two-week procedure that is mentioned in "How Well Are You Willing to Bee?" is quite simple.

Get a sting which you remove immediately and wait an hour. If everything is good, repeat the entire process until a total of 5 stings have been given. The next day do this again following the exact procedure. If everything is still good, follow this exact procedure every other day for two weeks. At this point the person can start BVT as they have been desensitized.

Pat also mentions on page 61 that she had been told that a biweekly injections process would take 2-1/2 to 3 years. Pat mentions in her book that she did this procedure on a person with MS who was allergic. She went on BVT two weeks later.

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Disclaimer: I am not a doctor. Anyone practicing Bee Venom Therapy should proceed at their own risk.
*******************************
 

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You just never know. My husband had never had a reaction at all, other than a red spot like a mosquito bite, until a few weeks ago. We went to catch a swarm and he got pegged on his left hand with two stings. We always take Benadryl right away, but even so, within 20 minutes he was crawling out of his skin, itching. I looked under his shirt and his entire torso was covered with massive welts.

We went straight to urgent care, where they gave him a steriod injection, and the usual trappings. At home that night when he went to take a shower, he still had welts, even on the tops of his feet ><. He took oral Prednisone for 3 days, then decided to stop. That night he was itching and getting welts again, and had to start all over again, DESPITE it having been a few days since the offending stings.:doh:

You just never know when or if you'll be hit with that one in a thousand sting that'll send you to the ER.
 

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Old English,
We must be living parallel lives.

I've been checking the yards with just a veil this year and so far have only received a triple-hit from a crabby hive and the occasional sting from a pinched bee. The reactions were local in nature and nothing to worry about.

Yesterday afternoon, I took advantage of a break in the rain to check a couple of colonies. I had a bottom-box frame hang up on a top-box frame as I pulled the top box. The frame dropped a few inches and my forearms were instantly covered in bees. I left the area 'very quickly' and got the bees off of my arms. While I only found 5 stingers, It felt as though I had been hit more than that. I felt just fine other than the pain from the stings. I suited up and finished inspecting the two colonies. While finishing up the last inspection my head got extremely warm and my palms began to itch. My lips felt 'fat'. But I had no problem breathing. Once I got the suit off, I realized that I may be in a bit of trouble. I had hives from my head to my toes. But, still no problems breathing. I popped a couple of Benadryl and again showed the kids how to use the Epi-pen - just in case Dad tipped over. In about 15 minutes, the symptoms started to fade. Today, I've got Popeye arms that really really hurt, but feel fine otherwise. As far as using the Epi-pen or calling 911, I suppose that I'm kinda thick-headed (stupid?) in my response to stuff like this. I felt fine and had help standing-by so didn't get too excited. Maybe the next time I'll make a different decision. I do know that I'm going back to long-sleeves in the bee yards.

Sorry for the long story. The point that I'd like to emphasize is that there seems to be a short hop from tolerating stings to not doing so well with them. If you can get a prescription for an Epi-pen, I'd recommend taking advantage of it. Learn how to use it and teach those around you how to use it. Let them know that calling 911 is part of the procedure.
 

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People All it takes is one sting to set the body up for the next big problem. the human body differs from one to another one person may get stung once and die from the sting. some one else may recive billions over the course of his life and never have a problem. But the linch pin to all this is like Dirty harry said you Feel lucky? well do you? wear gloves wear a bee suit there is a great bee suit advertisied on this forum. lessen the amount of stings and you can have a long beekeeping life.
 

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Also, my understanding is that the beta blockers interfere with the treatment in case of allergic reaction. It reduces the benefit of the epi pen and the Benedryll when it is administered. My apitherapist said once it is determined that I am not allergic that I can take the beta blocker while undergoing BVT.
Thanks Bee Bliss. I think allot of older people end up taking Beta Blockers for mild blood pressure isses. They probably don't even know its a Beta Blocker their taking.
 

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guys... the beta blockers render the epi shots ineffective ( they block the epi ).

The reaction to bee venom is a histamine response in the body. Take some benedryl (liquid preferably) immediately to kill the reaction.
I have been on BVT for almost 2 years now and the allergist insists that I take an antihistimine before getting the shots every week.

I just carry a bottle of benedryl around when working on the bees.
 

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That's rough. I can't even begin to advise you as to giving up the bees, but I would consider the fact that give them up or not, you will likely encounter a bee again. Desensitization might not be bad regardless.
 
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