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Does anyone see any problems with the following super simple method of package installation? I used it a few years ago and it worked fine - however temps were in the 70s then as opposed to the mid 40s currently.

1) remove cover, syrup can and queen cage from package
2) hang queen cage in center of hive
3) remove 3 or 4 frames from one side of hive
4) place package with bees in the space - hole side up and open

5) after a few days, remove now empty package and replace frames

This year I will be using drawn frames from dead-outs. It is still a bit cold here so I will feed with fondant on the frame tops rather than syrup through the hole in the inner cover. There will be some sort of rim to make room for the fondant.

My one concern is will bees leave the package quickly enough at these temperatures to tend to the queen and keep her warm?

I have 8 packages to install.
 

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Andrew, I would have the same worry, try this: hang the queen and then shake half the bees out, then you can place package box in the hive. At least you'd have enough to keep the queen warm and the others should come out quicker. PS. Used to live in Gouldsboro Point.



My one concern is will bees leave the package quickly enough at these temperatures to tend to the queen and keep her warm?

I have 8 packages to install.
 

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That is how they show it done on the videos on BeeWeavers website. The only thing they do different is to pour a small ball of the bees on top of the frames that the queen cage is wedged between.

http://www.beeweaver.com/beeweaver-videos Episode 3 is the one that shows installing the packages I think.
 

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Temp below say, 54, too risky in my opinion unless using TreeWinders method.

Part of the issue is the bees may prefer to hang in the empty space, meaning the queen has to be used as bait to draw them to the area you want them to cluster among the frames. But this necessarily means the queen being some distance from the bees.
 

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My one concern is will bees leave the package quickly enough at these temperatures to tend to the queen and keep her warm?
That would be my concern also, especially since the lows at night will be even colder. I have done all my package installs at higher temps, and I always just dump out the bees immediately. What I would do in those low temps, is to do it earlier, like in the afternoon, hopefully there is some sun too, just remove a few frames and dump the bees into the opening, hang the queen between a couple of the remaining frames near where you dumped in the bees, wait a minute for the pile of dumped bees to start climbing onto the frames, then insert the remaining frames back in the hive easily to minimize crushing any and close it up. Don't over spray or soak the bees with syrup before you dump them in, when you do that you get a soggy mass of bees at the bottom of the hive that will take much longer to climb off the pile and onto the combs. Not only that but it chills them in cool temps.
 

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I'd be afraid that they'd wax the box in place. I just shake. It takes no time at all and you're done.
 
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