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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Less than a month away before my first 6 packages are due to be picked up. I have my hives all painted with some mistined fugly green. I have all of my frames ready to go and I was able to purchase about 60 cement blocks to use as a base.

I will be adding 4 more hives about a month later from some nucs.

My goal is to let half of the hives run their course for a complete year and the other half I plan to make some splits so I can have more hives entering next year at this time. I do not want to buy more packages if I do not have to.

How many splits is possible out of 5 hives. They will be fed very heavily and given lots of pollen patties.


When doing my splits I have an area about 6 miles away to put the splits. It is a rather large farm. I have been told you can make a split from a package in about 6 weeks.


My.goal entering next year is 25 hives with a ultimate goal of about 200 in a few years.
 

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Almost impossible to tell until you see how strong they are. New packages on new foundation can take a while to draw everything out so you might not be able to split any your first year, or you might...
 

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if ther is one thng ive learned about planning with bees is that they dont make plans hahahaa. u have to do it when they are ready. doing anxious premature splits can set u and the colonies back a ways. let them tell u when they are ready. remember...they dont use calenders and dont wear watches. and,be careful with feeding 'a lot' of pollen patties. if they are bringing in pollen...dont feed them patties.

i made 17 splits last year and this winters polar vortex has wiped out about 60 percent of those and a few 2 deep colonies. u just never can tell....or rely on what u think is going to happen. just enjoy it as much as u can.
 

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better to plan than to plan at all.

A frame of drawn comb or an addition of brood can do wonders for package. I would feed as much as possible until the mainflow hits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I know this is going to be a never ending learning process. I have a lot of time to work them. My original post was just a set of goals to try to achieve.

It may or not be reality to accomplish it but I will give it my best, while at the same time not damage a decent colony. I will learn as I go, ask sixty- million questions.
 

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I would suggest a more conservative approach starting out. Your first year goals sound very aggressive considering you have no drawn comb and will be starting everything from scratch (If I read your post correctly). Unless you have a long excellent nectar flow in your area I would focus more on making sure all of your packages and nucs build up and are prepared for next winter. The following spring would be a better time to start planning on expansion with overwintered colonies. Hate to see you rush in and suffer a major setback. JMHO
 

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..... some mistined fugly green....
HJ, I googled "mistined fugly green" to find out what it is; your thread came up.

I have a colared olive green shirt that works well when I work bees. I was thinking of painting some new boxes with this color, as it would blend in with the surroundings and not draw attention. Is that close to mistined fugly green? :)
 

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I have been told you can make a split from a package in about 6 weeks.
Assuming absolutely everything goes completely perfectly, yes, but you can't count on that.

The last package I got apparently had a poorly mated queen. Laying pattern was kind of spotty, and then as soon as she laid one sheet of brood they requeened immediately. So my package of bees went a month after I installed it waiting on brood to hatch out (including the new queen), then 2 more weeks for her to mate, another week or two for her to start laying, and then finally after nearly 3 months and nearly the end of the season the hive settled down and got serious.

That was my only hive, so I've had to overwinter it as a glorified 5 frame nuc.

I have another nuc coming in next month, and I've got swarm traps out already, but I personally will not be splitting anything until I've got full double deeps going. I would rather go slow and be safe than try an early split when the hives aren't strong enough for it and either lose both splits or handicap one of the hives to where they can't build back up to 2 full deeps by winter again.
 
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