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Rats. There goes my theory that the bees wouldn't move in to high elevations. Santa Fe is around 7,000 ft. I wonder if this was their first summer there or if they've wintered over. It gets plenty cold there in January and February.

http://www.freenewmexican.com/news/33364.html
 

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Sorry about that, but it doesn't surprise me. I've felt for a long time that AHB can survive pretty much anywhere EHB can. They may be a tropical race of bee, but their ability to survive and thrive in temperate zones is proven. A lot of people predicted they'd never reach the US in the first place.

Once africans started mating with EHB, a new variety emerged. We don't know how far they're capable of migrating.

George-
 

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I think they were probably hitch-hiking AHB's. I kept bees in the SF area 1978-1996. That area where they were found won't support a colony year-around. The Keystone Kops who dealt with them obviously didn't have a clue about how to deal with an AHB swarm. Actually, I'm surprised that we haven't had more reports of AHB's in central and northern North America each summer. They can, after all, ride anywhere between the Mexican border to northern Manitoba during the summer months. And between the railroads and transcontinental travelers, there's plenty of opportunity for AHB swarms to move north. The real question, as you pointed out, Coyotl, is "How long were they there??" I'm not worrying about them until we get a confirmed report of AHB's in Minot ND in late February.
 
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