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So, when it gets cold like this in the South, does it knock back Aficanized Honey Bees, Small Hive Beetles and other tropical pests? I would think that it would, but I wondered if any of you folks down South have seen any changes in the population when it freezes a few nights in the past.It is suposed to freeze for a few nights in places like Mobile, Jacksonville, New Orleans, San Antonio, Corpus Christi, and Orlando.
Just curious, RKR
 

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Im sure many will be curious to see the results in areas that do not normally get real cold. If it freezes long enough, hopefully it will kill off some of the established feral colonies in there advancing front, like Florida. That would be real good new for queen breeders there.

Hive beetles can survive in the cluster here in Wisconsin over winter, so no it will not get rid of em.
 

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I'm not in the deep south, but temps in the teens every night for the past 2+ weeks has shown me that even the unwanted insects can adapt to the cold also. Found hive beetle, and unfortunately 2 v mites this past Monday.
 

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From the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension bulletin on Africanized honey bees:

"As Africanized bees expand into temperate
areas, their tropical adaptations are less advantageous.
Cold weather seems to limit both their defensiveness
and overwintering capacity. Africanized
bees are more defensive in warm tropical
regions and less so in cooler zones. In South
America the bees do not overwinter south of 34
degrees S latitude, which corresponds roughly to
Atlanta, Georgia. (Please note, however, that
Africanized bees are north of this latitude in the
American West.)"


Read the whole thing here: http://www.gabeekeeping.com/Forms/AHB_Bulletin.pdf
 

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Here in the Southwest it hasn't been very cold - nothing colder than we usually experience. It's been 70F or in the high 60'sF during the day and dropping into the 40'sF at night and sometimes drops down to freezing for a few hours. Most hives still have about a fifty drones +/-, and I've been able to continue raising queens.

When I relocated back to this area about fifteen years ago I resumed my reading of "Bee Culture" and "American Bee Journal" magazines. I quickly caught up with the news about Honey Bees and that the AHB had reached the U.S.A. and particularly my current location, several years before my return.

It could explain the unfamiliar behaviors of many of our local Honey Bees, which was quite different than any Honey Bee I had experience with in other parts of the country or even at this same location several decades earlier.

We have had several Winters where the lows sometimes dropped into the teens, but never noticed any changes in the behaviors of local unmanaged bee colonies.
 

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I am in north Alabama about two hours west of Atlanta on the 34th parallel and it is around 0 degrees here today and there was times last year it dropped to around 5 degrees. We have been above freezing for a total of about 4 hours in the past week. I hope that this alone will keep them in the tropics and that we don't have to deal with them.
 

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The master beekeeper I know says it is a load of bull to say thta shbs cant overwinter in ohio. maybe if the cold supirsed the shb's or something. The africanized hives hopefully will get knock back like you said.
 

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Not sure about the AHB, but I hope it helps.

SHB will overwinter in the cluster. That is why it helps to have beetle traps inside the hive in the fall. Many SHB not inside a hive will not survive cold like we are having.
 
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