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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Juhani, I looked through the ones she originally posted and there are indeed many similar idioms in American English. Reading through the Twitter posts, I really liked the saying " like shearing a pig, a lot of squealing but not much wool".
 

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I always liked, "You can't put lipstick on a pig" and "You can't polish a cow turd".

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Juhani, I looked through the ones she originally posted and there are indeed many similar idioms in American English. Reading through the Twitter posts, I really liked the saying " like shearing a pig, a lot of squealing but not much wool".
Can you specify which sayings have a similar version in English?
 

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Take off like a pike from shore would have the same meaning as:

Take off like a bat out of hell.
Take off like a shot.

People would probably understand the Finnish phrase because we have pike here also and plenty of people fish for them.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Juhani, I copied and numbered the original list

1 .”Take off like a pike from the shore" (Lähteä kuin hauki rannasta) To leave/take off very quickly.

A variation of the same theme: "Take off like a goldeneye from a nest box" (Lähteä kuin telkkä pöntöstä

2. "Show where the hen pisses from" (Näyttää, mistä kana pissii) To show who's boss.

A variation of the same theme: "To show someone a jaybird's eggs (Näyttää närhen munat)

3. "To walk in line like the piglets of a poor house" (Kulkea jonossa kuin köyhän talon porsaat) Refers to a small group of people walking in a single file line.

4. "To stare at something like a bull at a new fence" (Tuijottaa kuin sonni uutta aitaa) To stare intently or with a stupefied expression.

5. "To get caught on top of a fyke net" (Jäädä kiinni rysän päältä) To get caught in the act

6. "To sway like a hayman" (Heiluu kuin heinämies) To fuss around very actively

7. "To improve like a pig its run" (Parantaa kuin sika juoksuaan) To show clear and quick improvement

8. "To fly like a headless hen" (Lentää kuin päätön kana) To fuss around without apparent logic
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9. "To lead someone like a ram in a rope" (Viedä kuin pässiä narussa) To manipulate or lead someone

10. "You shouldn't place all your eggs in one basket" (Ei pidä laittaa kaikkia munia yhteen koriin) You shouldn't stake too much on one thing

11. "Even the horse kicks out of love" (Rakkaudesta se hevonenkin potkii) A supremely annoying thing to say to a girl bullied by boys.

12. "Who reaches for a fir will fall on a juniper" (Joka kuuseen kurkottaa, se katajaan kapsahtaa) If you aim too high, you will meet a sorry end (a recurring theme in Finnish idioms

13. "As easy as making hay" (Helppoa kuin heinänteko) Refers to something super easy

14. "Declines like a cow's tail" (Laskee kuin lehmän häntä) To show a strong declining trend

15. "Talk to the goat" (Puhu pukille) Denotes lack of interest or belief
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16. "Let the horse worry, it has a bigger head" (Anna hevosen surra, sillä on isompi pää) Said to little kids when they are upset about something. I always found this idea of a horse with a big head strangely comforting.

These are some of the American idioms and saying that convey the same ideas.

1. Take off like a bat out of Hell, Run like a scalded dog
2. See who wears the pants
3.
4.
5. Get caught with your hand in the cookie jar
6.
7.
8. Run around like a chicken with it’s head cut off
9. Lead like a lamb to slaughter
10. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
11. You only hurt the ones you love
12.
13. A piece of cake
14. Drop like a rock
15. Talk to the hand
16.


If anyone else wants to add to this, please feel free. Some idioms are used in different parts of the country.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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Americans have a whole host of agraian idioms, just not ones that express similar concepts as those in the post. One that comes to mind with the recent heavy rains is "like a cow pissing on a flat rock" which is similar to its "raining cats and dogs".

Then there are expressions like

letting the cat out of the bag, to divulge a secret.

Buying a pig in a poke, to purchase something without inspecting it first.

Looking a gift horse in the mouth, to find fault with an item given to you.

Counting your chickens before they hatch, relying on an outcome which is uncertain.

The list goes on and on.

If I didn't need to go to work, I could keep listing them "until the cows came home"
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Americans have a whole host of agraian idioms, just not ones that express similar concepts as those in the post.
One could reason that there is no difference in the popularity of agrarian idioms in different languages, or what do you think?

There might be some difference according to the speed of urbanization in different countries. After moving to cities this kind of idioms lose their edge and people start using different forms of them?
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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I think that most languages have a slew of agraian idioms, some of which are almost universal, others partucular to a culture or climate. I fear the underlying concepts are being lost on the younger generation that have never had a "tough row to hoe". But urbanization brings about a new set of idioms, some of which I have to have explained to me.
 

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Aylett, VA 10-frame double deep Langstroth
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You can always lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink. To provide someone with all the information necessary to make a good decision, but you can't make the decision for him, or a variation of that theme.
 

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A hog on ice.

That one was the title on a book of such curious expressions I read in grade school. Not an assignment... See examples every few years on the news when deer try to cross ice, very ungraceful.
 

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Hollering like a scalded cat

One way to skin a cat

JW, when someone tells me "you can lead a horse to water...." I always tell them, "that horses head is going under water and we will see if he drinks or drowns" :D

Screaming like a stuck pig

Stubborn as a mule

dumb as an ox

bring home the bacon

Take the bull by the horns

don't be a chicken

Can't plant a straight row -- Someone who always screws things up.

dirt poor

One horse town--really small town

You'd have to stand on a chair to kick a duck ---------------One of my favorites from granddad, a reference to someone who is really short.

A riddle from grandad; Why is a horse with it's head hanging down like Monday? answer; It's necks week.

Gone to seed.
 

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Minds are like parachutes, they only work if they are open.
Footprints through the sands of time are not made by sitting down.
Suck it and see.
 
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