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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm Tim.

I couldn't think of a better place to have this answered.

I have 20 acres and am building a fence.

There is one section of the fence, near the trees, where I keep getting attacked. They'll chase me for over 100 feet and they're FAST! So fast.

I know why, obviously. I try to be quiet when I'm there and wear muted colors. I can't help smelling wonderful...

I don't want to kill or remove the bees. I want them here doing their job.

How do I stop them attacking long enough to finish the fence?

Things to know: I haven't seen the hive and don't know where it is, but I know what tree it must be near. I have no beekeeping gear. I have small children who accompany me and I don't want them attacked. I still need to mow the area in the future.

Any help is most welcomed!

Thanks
 

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Are they honey bees or yellow jackets ? Sounds like yellow jackets
Aggressive yellow jackets in May - a mismatch.
Maybe deep south.

Entire possible it is a highly defensive feral bee nest.
If anyone, it would be the honey bees that can chase you for hundreds of feet.

Without a location on map, not much to talk about.
 

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Tim, the very first question that must be answered is where are you located? Geography matters in these things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you, all!

I'm in Northeast Texas.

We do have some wasps, but these are bees.

I found a neighbor who keeps bees who is going to go help me identify them.

My biggest question now is, if they are bees and not of the honey-providing variety, how do I keep them happy without relocating them?

I want them here, just not attacking me and the kiddos.

Again, thanks so much!
 

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I'm in Northeast Texas.
Could have aggressive genetics. Way up here in Idaho I do not see the same bees as you do in Texas. I'll leave advice to those who know better...
 

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I vote for destroying the colony based on limited information. Sometimes bees are just mean and need to be destroyed. You aren’t helping the local beekeepers or bee population leaving it alone because that hive is pumping out drones with aggressive genetics.

Maybe you can find a beekeeper willing to do a cutout but those are no fun with hot bees. If they were in a hive , you could combine them into other hives but your case, there is a wild colony somewhere.

This time of year in Texas, the bees are about as gentle as they will ever be with all the nectar and pollen available. Wait till August during the dearth and those bees will be dangerous!

Armor up. Borrow a bee suit. I kill hot bees in hives with 5gallons of soapy water but this is probably a wild colony of Africanized bees. I had a hot colony in the eaves of a house and had to use sevin dust to dispatch them. Made me sad but mean bees aren’t helping anyone.

My 2 cents.
 

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I say this. If the hive is big, break down into 2 nucs or 3. . Then buy some good queens with good qualities. Requeen original hive and add a queen to the ones you made nucs out of. Buy mid to late june all the mean bees will have died off. And if all goes well for all splits. You got a start in spring next year and may not have to buy bees.
 

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You could build your fence at night or wear a bee suit. If you have small children it sounds like your best bet is to hire someone with experience and kill that hive. Don't fall for the "the bees are in trouble" line of thought. There's plenty of feral hives out there "doing their job". Lots of very defensive honey bees in Texas
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for your input.

I'm going to go look at the bees and see what they are, first.

I'm not so interested in "saving the bees", but I do want bees around because I love the work that they do.

If they are honey bees, I have read several ways by which you can calm them down and remove the aggressive behavior.

If they are not honey bees, I'll have to consider the dangers they present and decide from there.

I will update this thread just for fun once I know more.

Again, thank you all so much for your input.
 

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Likely these bees are in a hollow tree and you can not just "break them up onto nucs" and such.
:)

Call experienced Africansed bee removers so that they can find that bee tree and kill/plug the bees shut.
Otherwise, wait until winter and the bees are inside (IF you have winter at all) and finish your fence then.
 

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Northeast Texas has the Africanized Honey Bee, as does the southwest part of Arkansas. If in doubt that a colony is European Honey Bees, kill the colony. A life is more valuable that a colony of bees.
 

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I'm curious, you said you smell wonderful, so what do you smell like? Muted scents matter as much or more than muted colors. A honey bee's alarm pheromone smells like bananas, for example. Leave off the aftershave if you intend to go out there.

I don't know of any native bees that get so aggressive. If they're not honey bees, what others are there? Wasps and hornets. But if these are honey bees, they could be the Africanized variety and they can be very dangerous. I recommend you keep the kiddos out of that section until the situation is corrected.
 

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A mean feral hive should be dispatched. As said earlier, they're producing drones that are negatively affecting other bee keeper's efforts to breed manageable stock. Just as bad, they are likely producing swarms that will inhabit other trees and houses, causing trouble for others. Trouble for others leads to bad reputations for all bee species and in turn creates a public attitude that bees are bad.

They are the bad apple, don't let them spoil the proverbial bunch. If you want bees around, become or find a beekeeper to place hives on your property.
 

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Agree with the posters who said just destroy them. Too much "save the bees" hype out there. These bees just need to be DEAD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
UPDATE: They are honey bees. They are happily doing their job from a hollowed tree. A beekeeping greetings came over with some suits and we got a really good look at them.

I was able to finish the fence without us bothering each other. Ichose a cloudy early morning. So no issue there.

I sometimes sit and watch them work for a minute. So busy!

So, I'm not well-read enough to know whether the bee issue is a real issue or hype. What I can say is that they have a very important job to do. As long as our paths don't cross too often in a painful way, I'm going to let them stay as long as they'd like.

Thanks to all for your advice and comments!
 

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UPDATE: They are honey bees. They are happily doing their job from a hollowed tree. A beekeeping greetings came over with some suits and we got a really good look at them.

I was able to finish the fence without us bothering each other. Ichose a cloudy early morning. So no issue there.

I sometimes sit and watch them work for a minute. So busy!

So, I'm not well-read enough to know whether the bee issue is a real issue or hype. What I can say is that they have a very important job to do. As long as our paths don't cross too often in a painful way, I'm going to let them stay as long as they'd like.

Thanks to all for your advice and comments!
Sounds like you can leave them alone for now and think about it.
As long as they don't really bother you - just let them be (my take).
 
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