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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a cut-out to do in a couple of weeks and the nature of the building will make it difficult to eliminate all entrances to the cavity. I won't have much trouble removing the bees themselves, but the sealing up afterwards will be challenging. A fall construction project on the building will eliminate the cavity completely, so is there anything i can do to discourage a swarm of bees from moving back in before fall? some spray, chemical,..etc that i could leave after removing the bees?
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Thanks,

Kris
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Somewhat humbling to overlook the most obvious choice. I'll bring some fiberglass batt with me.

Thanks for the information!
 

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Spray the cavity with soapy water. It kills the smell so the next bee is not attracted to the cavity.
Place a half a dozen mothballs in the cavity, The smell usually drives the bees out.
Forget spray foam, the bees will go through it in an hour.
Anybody that has pulled a colony out from under a mobile trailer knows bees don't mind fibreglass at all.
Premixed concrete patch in a bucket will seal just about any entrance.
 

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If you fill the cavity completely they will not go through the trouble of dragging the insulation back out. soapy water or bleach water will work to clean the residue for sure but the moth balls are an unpleasant odor for people also. If you have ever removed bees from a business or an expensive home the owner will not appreciate the odor of moth balls. You are right they do not like moth balls it will keep them out. I perform removals as if it were my own home and with the intention of getting repeat business. I do suggest to people that are allergic to bee stings to hang moth balls outside in areas they frequent. Now those people don't mind dealing with the odor of moth balls!
 
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