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i caught a swarm on saturday that i swear is africanized. never had any bees attack me like that swarm and incredibly difficult to get into a box.
 

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But now you need to figure out what to do. I've heard from some people who actually work Africanized bees that other than requiring you to work with full gear and more spoke they are quite immune to many of the pests that plague our more docile bees. Whether or not you have a location that you can keep them well out of the way of any people, and if you willing to work them you may find they are really good producers. You just need to get past their anger management issues.

Problem that I see with them is that over time, and in the areas where they can survive it won't be too many more years where they may be the norm. I suspect it's only a matter of time, I really don't see them being stopped.
 

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You know reading the article brought to mind something that I think they will end up overlooking in the long run about the AHB. Most commercial Beeks use foundation in their hives, which makes the bees larger by default. If there is only microscopic diff between EHB and AHB normally, then how will they know for sure if they are unnaturally larger ?

Then the one statement they made, only 1 bee was tested? Was that all they could catch?
 

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i caught a swarm on saturday that i swear is africanized. never had any bees attack me like that swarm and incredibly difficult to get into a box.
My neighbor couldnt get either of hi russian swarms in the box. Ball of bees moved from the limb to his head. Followed him 150' - 200'. His russians attack by the hundreds unless they are in a really good mood, then they may only send 50 or so bees out to meet your face if you get within 20' -25' of his hives. I would expect african bees to not be as docile, but with 150 bees on your face how could you tell the difference?
 

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Because one day they may be the only bees available in some areas. This isn't an opinion only I hold, the writing is on the wall with regards to AFB and I don't see us stopping them in areas they thrive. Either all bees are killed or people learn to live with and manage them. I know of people who manage them and they love them (once they figured out how to manage them). I've heard they make lots of honey and varroa and other common bee ailments don't affect them so they are, in some extents what is needed for bees to survive; if we can get over their anger management issues and learn how to manage them.
 

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If a swarm has been hanging around out in bad weather for a few days they can be pretty hot. Ive caught a couple as a swarm that would flat get after you, but as soon as they get settle in a hive and get some brood and some syrup in them they just act like normal bees.
 

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If they survived the past brutal winter here I'd be shocked, but Grand Junction, wow. I would say their hypothesis of a Texas queen or more likely a colony brought back from the almonds is how they arrived. Their genetics have been here for a while. Glad they're "confirmed" here, can't wait to start working with them.
 

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>i think i will be sending a few of these into the lab if they stay as aggressive as they were saturday.

Are you going to keep them if they aren't AHB?
it will depend on how much they mellow out after they settle into the hive and get to work. i'm only in my 2nd year, but last year toward the end of the season i had a pretty big and aggressive hive that was a prolific producer. i decided that i could deal with some aggression if they consistently produced that much honey. time will tell with this new one.
 

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But now you need to figure out what to do. I've heard from some people who actually work Africanized bees that other than requiring you to work with full gear and more spoke they are quite immune to many of the pests that plague our more docile bees. Whether or not you have a location that you can keep them well out of the way of any people, and if you willing to work them you may find they are really good producers. You just need to get past their anger management issues.

Problem that I see with them is that over time, and in the areas where they can survive it won't be too many more years where they may be the norm. I suspect it's only a matter of time, I really don't see them being stopped.
:thumbsup: Agreed
 

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Shame to destroy without further investigation. Overwintered queen or recent usurpation?
 

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I agree. I would be skeptical of the assertion that AHB can overwinter in CO. I'm also curious what test they used to determine they are AHB. The article says "genetic testing", but later it talks about body part size measurements which sounds like the FABIS test which is less than reliable IMO. There are a lot of reasons wings and legs could be small not related to AHB.
 

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I'm skeptical of the wishful thinking that AHB cannot survive harsh winters. But I don't see what difference it makes what genetics they are. If they are mean I would requeen. There have always been mean bees and it has always been a bad idea to keep them...
 

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But I don't see what difference it makes what genetics they are.
The biggest difference may be in the public's response to beekeeping. Local AHB fear based ordinances come to mind.

That difference may be a greater impact than the persistence of the breed's efforts to usurp hives. A totally AHB gene pool may be harder to find than a totally pure Italian line in 20 years.
 
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