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I lost some colonies last Winter due to having used an antibiotic that was long out-dated. As the AFB wasn't as bad as it could have been, there were relatively few evidences on the combs (i.e. perforated cells, etc.) Aside from destroying all of my brood comb and starting anew, how can I identify which combs were affected? Thank you very much for your assistance.
 

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if you had foul brood in the hive I would destory all the frames and comb then scorch the boxes. It is impossible to see AFB spores without a microscope. 5 frame nuc $85.00. 10 new frames with foundation $20.00 I wouldnt chance looseing the $85.00 nuc reusing frames
 

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How do you know it was foul brood? What were the symptoms?

Whereas AFB will weaken a hive so that they don't have the resources to overwinter, winter kill is caused by any number of things.

One symptom of AFB is dried black scales in the cells that are difficult for the bees to remove.

What treatments beside the antibiotic were you using?

Rick
 

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You used terramycin on a colony that you knew had AFB? If so, that was a mistake. You should have burned all of the frames from the infected hive, schorched the supers and started all over again w/ new bees and new frames w/ foundation.

I reread your post. After winter loss you found that dead colonies had perferated cappings, right? Was there any other evidence of AFB? Such as sunken cappings and an oilie look to the surface of the comb? Did you get lab confirmation of your diagnosis? Hold about the opinion of a more experienced beekeeper or an Apiary Inspector?

You may not actually have AFB. But if you do, burn all of the frames and honey still in them.
 
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