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Discussion Starter #1
I'm hoping that I won't need the advice I'm asking for because I'll find a queen or eggs today, but I'm trying to get my plan worked up for what to do if I don't.

I hived two packages last weekend at an apiary about a 15 minute drive from my home. These are the only bees at that location. The queen flew from one of them, and I don't know if she returned to the hive. Assuming that it is queenless, here are the options I see:

1. Try to obtain a new queen and introduce her. This would normally be my choice, but I will be out of town for the first two weeks of May. Assuming that I see no evidence of a queen this weekend, I would want to wait another week before requeening, and that takes me to the leave-date for the trip. I think this effectively means I can't use this option.

2. Take a frame containing eggs from the other colony at that location, put it in the queenless hive, and let them raise their own. My biggest problem with this option is that removing a frame from the other colony is pretty significant for a newly-hived package. Seems like it would set that colony back a bit. Also, I doubt that there is a good population of drones with which a virgin could mate; the only bees I'm aware of in the area is the one other new hive.

3. Take a frame with eggs from my home apiary and put it in the queenless hive. The problem with this one is transporting the frame. How traumatic would a 15 minute drive be to a frame of bees? Is it even feasible to do this?

4. Combine the two colonies in place. I doubt they would build up quicly enough to be split this season (they're on foundation) but better to use the resources of the queenless hive than just let it die.

Comments? Other options?

Thanks.
 

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Option 3 and 4 are both good in my opinion. If you do not want to "move a frame" then bring the colony back to your home home apiary to complete the task. Just my thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Interesting idea to transport the colony instead of the frame.

Anyone have suggestions on the best way to transport a frame containing eggs to an apiary 15 minutes away? I don't own a nuc box so I guess I would cobble something together using a spare super.

If you did this, would you take the covering bees on the frame or shake them off before transporting?
 

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I think power napper's idea is feasible,but if you decide to transport the frame just make sure it doesn't get knocked about too much and the eggs don't suffer from a temperature change they should be alright.I think I'd wait to see if the hive is definatly queenless and if it is combine the 2 of them,you could always give the hive a booster later on with a frame of capped brood cells from your home apiary it would be a lot easier to transport.
 
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