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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am going to give a little talk on the advantages of tbh at me next beeclub meeting. i am prety new at this top bar thing. can anyone give me some key points i can make than i will elaborate on them at the meeting.
 

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Why, if you know so little about TBHs, are you giving a talk about them?
Do you, personally, see any advantages to TBH beekeeping?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
so far i got price- canmake from scrap wood to any size you want

natural cell size- many benifits

astetics- looks less like a beehive(urban beekeeping)

no supers- less heavy lifting

crush and strain-plenty of harvested wax to use for other projects

cut comb honey- brings more money in some markets
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well because the president of the club asked me to.....as far as i know i am the only one in the club that even has a clue what a top bar hive is. i know why i want them but i tend to look over some things. i want to get some more input to make shure i dont miss anything.
i am not good at public speeking. i want to make a paper to use. like i said i need key points then i will elaborate on them. thank you mark for your positive assurance in spreading the word about top bar beekeeing. the question is do you mark see any advantages of top bar beekeeping? please share.
 

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TBHs were conceived as a low or no cost way to keep bees in a primitive way for people without access to manufactured anything. That is there main advantage.
 

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so far i got price- canmake from scrap wood to any size you want
natural cell size- many benifits
astetics- looks less like a beehive(urban beekeeping)
no supers- less heavy lifting
crush and strain-plenty of harvested wax to use for other projects
cut comb honey- brings more money in some markets
- they enable the bees to build comb as they want to build it, without the constraints of foundation and frames

- they enable the beekeeper to see much of what is going on in the hive without having to take it apart: you see real bee behaviour, not the result of what happens when beekeepers open hives

- they are easy and cheap to build, needing little woodworking skill

- you are never dependent on the prices dealers choose to charge for equipment and spares

- they are about the only way people with disabilities can keep bees, as there is no lifting involved

- did I say there was NO LIFTING?

- honey can be harvested without disturbing the bees

- they are very stable (if you incorporate legs) and less likely to be toppled by wind or animals

Will that do for a start? Take a look at my site if you need more...

Good luck with your talk!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
tried to join the forum but i havent recived my conformation e-mail yet. been 3 days
 

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I personally think it has a lot to do with expectations and remembering that it's not a competition.

One key point to bring up is that once one person is using a TBH, it does not mean everyone must adopt them as well.

Buckbee makes many good points above.

I say expectations because every hive type has it's pros and cons and I think every hive type fits a niche type of beekeeping more suitably than others.

If you expect to be a major honey producer and get the most extra honey out of each colony possible, TBH's may not necessarily be the best for that.

If you are conservation beekeeper and looking to provide a minimally intrusive, easily accessible hive, a TBH may very well fit your objectives.

Home hobby beekeepers may find a TBH well suited to their needs because as Buckbee says, they are not obvious to neighbors, they are managed one top bar at a time and there is not "too much" honey produced to make it unmanageable or overwhelming.

to each their own and vive la diferance

Big Bear
 

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I think you are on the right track. I am new to beekeeping, and this was really nice to start with. Lots to read on this forum. Let me know if you have any questions in particular. I'm laid up with a broken leg and ready to help!
 

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- they enable the beekeeper to see much of what is going on in the hive without having to take it apart: you see real bee behaviour, not the result of what happens when beekeepers open hives

- honey can be harvested without disturbing the bees
Really? How do you see anything that is going on in the hive w/out taking it apart, opening it?

And how do you harvest honey w/out disturbing the bees?
 

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thank you mark for your positive assurance in spreading the word about top bar beekeeing. the question is do you mark see any advantages of top bar beekeeping? please share.
Well 11x, I'm glad that i didn't come across negative. I do encourage you to do what you enjoy and spread the word about why you do.

Some suggestions about public speaking are to talk to the back of the room, look at the tops or foreheads of audience members, they won't know that you aren't looking them in the eye. If you are using a hand held microphone, hold it up to your chin. If the mike is stationery, you don't need to lean in to it for it to work, just talk as though you were talking to someone half way down the room.

Personally TBHs don't fit into my way of keeping bees. If I was only going to have one or two hives, perhaps they would.

I can't stand the idea of crushing and straining honey comb, when one could extract and reuse comb.

What ever floats your boat, as the saying goes.
 

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Really? How do you see anything that is going on in the hive w/out taking it apart, opening it?
If you use a follower either side of the colony, you can simply move it aside an take a look at the brood end or the stores end. Vastly less invasive than ripping a super off a hive.

And how do you harvest honey w/out disturbing the bees?
Same thing. When the bees are busy foraging, you can take combs from the stores end and they hardly notice.
 

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i am going to give a little talk on the advantages of tbh at me next beeclub meeting. i am prety new at this top bar thing. can anyone give me some key points i can make than i will elaborate on them at the meeting.
TBH's are a inexpensive way to start beekeeping. If you decide later that beekeeping wasn't your thing, you don't have a lot of money tied up in it.

They can be used as a transitional hive to move to Langs later.

That was how I started with 3 local swarms and have slowly over the last 4 years built my stock of Langs. I currently use both Langs and TBH's.

With no beekeeping suppliers close, building your own TBH's saves a lot of shipping costs also.

I talked about TBH's at the last local meeting and the more experienced beeks didn't really listen and told me I make it sound too easy. Be ready to take some criticism. The new beeks seem to have a more open mind.

Let me know when your next meeting is and if i'm free, i'll come over and give you some support.
 

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I have 2 TBH's [one Kenyan and one Tanzinanian] and one long hive [frames]. I do super my TBH when the hive gets full. i find, otherwise they either swarm or just shut down. I find the TBH's require more management than my long hive and produce less honey.
 

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I have Kenya TBH's only so I can't really compare to other hives.
When I first looked into having bees and all the health problems they were having I couldn't justify the cost of the equipment and bees if there was a good chance they were going to perish anyway. My cost was $30 using new material and their volume is in comparison of 3 Lang deeps.
I was also told that I could not keep bees alive without treating them which was discouraging and made me rethink if I even wanted to get bees.

So the cost was a big obstacle for me. A few things that I have noticed about the Kenya TBH for what it's worth are:

1)The sloped sides always stay dry in the rain.
2)The sloped sides don't get direct sun.
3)Ventilation wise I close the entrances down to one 3/4" hole for wintering and they stay dry inside. I don't know why this is but I don't see the Lang people doing this or being comfortable with it.

I started with one package three years ago and I'm over wintering eight colonies now with no treatments to date. If my bees continue to do well I will be looking forward to trying a Lang or two.
 
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