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I have a hive of russians. I was thinking of adding another brood box of previously fully drawn foundation that I stored over the winter. It has been really warm down here and the bees need another brood box. my question is, do I wait to add it, and if I add it do i but the empty one on the bottom or top or does it matter?
Thanks MB!
 

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How many frames in your present box are full of brood and or stores???

Generally you add a box if you have 7 or so full frames in a 10 frame box. If they are congested with loads of brood ready to emerge them for sure add another story.

Again, generally you put the empty box on top.
 

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>I was thinking of adding another brood box of previously fully drawn foundation that I stored over the winter.

So it's one deep and nothing else right now?

>It has been really warm down here and the bees need another brood box. my question is, do I wait to add it

If the current one is full, sure. If not, then wait.

> and if I add it do i but the empty one on the bottom or top or does it matter?

The bees will adjust but on top is the typical method and works fine and does not require lifting the other box.
 

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stinger, if they need the room, put the deep on top.

Is there anything coming in in your area? A friend of mine, near Manning, SC, says that the Jasmine is in bloom and causing problems for his queen rearing efforts.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
sqkcrk,
I pulled up all my jasmine (beautiful plant!) last year when i heard they are not good for bees. I haven't noticed if it is in bloom but it seems everything else is. We had an unusually warm winter.
Thanks to all who gave your advice! It is appreciated!
 

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My understanding is that Yellow Jasmine is a naturally found plant that is all over SC. Was what you pulled up something that you had planted?
 

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Michael Bush, I can't site any documented source but amongst beekeeper friends of mine, the word is that nectar from Yellow Jasmine is "lethal" or at least hard on bees. Poisonous, I guess. My buddy Chuck, currently in SC, is blaming his queen rearing problems on the Jasmine flow. He hopes it will be over soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
MB, the head of our local beekeeper assoc. said it and I remember reading it somewhere before. I'm thinking bee culture but I'm not sure. and yes sqkcrk. I had went for walk a couple years ago and saw some growing on the side of the road a couple miles away, pulled it up and planted it near the trellis in my yard
 

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It depends what is weather and what is climate.

In early summer when nights are cold it is hard case to put 100% more room and obligue bees heat so much room at once.

In spring I put allways second box to bottom. Bees use the room if they are able to enlarge brood area.

I have found that bees destroy a lot brood from lower box if they are not able to keep them warm. And mostly they cannot.
 

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Isn't there a difference between "Carolina Jessamine" and "jasmine"? I think it is only the jessamine that is poisonous, but I may be wrong.
 

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In Walt's article "Nectar Management" he talks about keeping 2 supers above the bees at all time.

Now, with my very limited bee knowledge. I was taking from this article he was talking about the brood, not the honey. Am I correct?
He mentioned some super as needed and this was wrong, that we shouldn't limit the bees this way.

Thanks,
Craig
 

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Craig,
If I understand what you're asking, Walt doesn't distinguish per sey between super and brood chamber. By that, I mean, the shallows he puts on top via checkerboarding, he expects the brood nest to expand into. Later in the season, the queen slows down laying and the bees will fill that area with honey. Now those boxes are "supers" in that they only contain stores. So really it is an issue of symantics determined by what the bees are using it for...

STinger,
From all accounts I've heard from your area, your hive should be really full in one deep. Right?
If so, some friends of mine recommend pulling up a frame or 2 of brood from the lower and centering it in the top deep. This should encourage the hive and queen to move into this box faster. Mind you'll want, as all have suggested, to be sure there are enough bees to manage the expanded broodnest. But with a full hive and good weather, you'll have set them up to really bloom out.

Craig mentioned Nectar Management. If you get behind, according to Walt's observation of spring processes, your hive will have expanded the broodnest to the size it will tolerate and then started reducing it. I'm honestly not sure (if what Walt says is true) if you can encourage a hive who's moved on to "backfilling" to once again expand its broodnest.
Waya
 

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Waya,
Yes that was what I was asking, THANKS. I now understand what Walt is saying in that article. I think I was confused on what he was doing and what everyone else was talking about and a super and brood hive get interchanged.

Thanks,
Craig
 
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