Beesource Beekeeping Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I am an aspiring hobbyist, and have no experience from almonds, so please bear over with me if I am asking a dumb question.

Whenever I see pictures from almond-pollination I see mainly white hives and normally on pallets. So far so good.

Still I would have figured that tar-paper or something similar would have been used at the eastern side of the hives to get most out of the morning sun. I understand that the sun will give quite a bit of heat at a clear mid-day, and that the hives should be shaded for that period of the day.

I have read somewhere that a hive will be an efficient pollinator for about 4 hours during a good day on almonds. If that could be raised to 4.5, 5 or even more, my guess is that the growers would be willing to pay more for each hive, as they would need less of them.

Am I totally off here? Or maybe this is the practice today, but I haven't noticed it?

BTW: I also winder why there are water-hogging grass inbetween the rows of almond and weather they use some kind of lining under the trees to keep the moisture from disappearing down and away. -But I guess that may be a question for a different place and time.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,488 Posts
I think what you are suggesting would work, but the factor is man power. You have to realize that millions of hives are put into almonds and not much time to get them in and out. Little attention is paid to orientation. My hives are actually painted a dark green and others use whatever is available but I guess the majority are white so that's probably why it appears that way.

I think getting a almond farmer to pay more for more flying time would be a nice thing...If you can sell them on the idea...count me in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
I'm thinking that the almond growers are paying for hives for the pollination season not the number of hours worked per day. From what I have read, the almond growers do not release the bees until the blooms fall from the trees. The growers are working off of "tree" time not "bee" time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
The ambient temperature of 55degrees F will send the foragers out of the hive to search for pollen and nectar.

(Ambient temperature is a term which refers to the temperature in a room, or the temperature which surrounds an object under discussion. Ambient temperatures play a major role in personal comfort, as well as the function of many types of machines and equipment, and various methods can be used to control ambient temperature. Usually, control methods are designed to keep the temperature stable, as temperature fluctuations can cause discomfort.)
Ernie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
Since we have most of our hives at somewhat higher elevations 3,000 to 6,000 feet, we decided to paint them brown, first to help them warm up a little faster and second to make them less obvious to passersby. We did have a small problem with overheating last summer at the 3,000 foot level, when some frames on the sunny side just melted down in a pile. We have since repainted some of our hives a much lighter color and will try to provide shade for the sunnier hives.

It stands to reason though that inside temps may not make the bees want to fly in colder weather.

We are staying out of almonds until we understand CCD, and we have bees to spare, which may be a while.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top