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i appreciate you having brought the videos to our attention msl.

like with their advances in the understanding and management of efb, it appears that the europeans are making a more organized effort with respect to breeding for mite resistance than we are here in the u.s.

juhani, forgive me if you have already posted about it but are you doing any collaborating with either the arista or the kirchhain groups? i thought i heard finland mentioned in one of dr. buchler's videos.
 

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juhani, forgive me if you have already posted about it but are you doing any collaborating with either the arista or the kirchhain groups? i
No I´m not.

Kirchhain group is for carnica breeders only.

Arista is doing this VSH breeding with one-drone-insemination system and artificial contamination of nucs. I have a timetable problem with our short summer.

Arista group beekeepers are mostly all treating, and they hope that the high enough VSH%(SMR%) bees will be all right without treatments when released to public use and mite pressure form outside. I would not be so sure, but anyhow, it is good that there are many approaches to varroa resistance breeding, the more the better: every different breeding approach will come up with a different surviving strategy of bees, good for the future in terms of inbreeding and versatility.
 

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So far, I got 3 packages in the spring (2019) and installed them with stores. I did the same OAV (oxalic) treatments on all of them. I did 1 OAV 3 weeks after install. They replaced their queens 1 month later. I did 3 rounds of 4 OAV treatments starting in late summer, then 1 round of 2 treatments (on 12/23, 12/24).

I did a heavy open feeding + sugar bricks in late fall. They started winter with 4 mediums. The top mediums were added late with empty comb and frames. I This winter, the low was around 0 degrees F. They always fly above 45 F with no rain. Last week, I did my 1 winter check. They look as big as in the fall. They ate the bricks. I'm adding 4 lb bricks around 2/28. I ordered 2 TF queens from Troy Hall (nhbeekeeper.com). I will multiply the Hall queens. Excluders should help to keep the package drones from mating. I should have all good queens by Fall 2020. Then, I'm going to treat 1/3 of my hives.
 

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Discussion Starter #825 (Edited)
Good reason MSL to question the usefulness of pin tests.
It would seem support for the pin kill test being a reasonable way to test is growing.
Spivak, Danka (2020) Perspectives on hygienic behavior in Apis mellifera and other social insects
In sum, the freeze-killed and pin-killed brood assays for hygienic behavior are useful screening tools to find colonies that may remove diseased and mite-infested brood upon subsequent challenge. For Varroa in particular, selecting bees based on these assays will yield colonies with lower mite loads relative to unselected colonies
The most hygienic colonies, those that uncapped pin-killed brood (see section on “Assays” below), also tended to uncap cells and cannibalize the chalkbrood-infected brood before the brood was consumed by fungal mycelia and became infectious “mummies.”
Researchers in Germany have used the pin-killed brood assay in breeding programs to successfully reduce mite loads
Hygienic colonies, determined based on the pin-killed brood assay, tended to remove worker pupae infected with DWV (Schöning et al. 2012).
I had discounted the pin test in the past(even though I really wanted it to be a thing), seems to be an american gadget obsession leading to favoritism toward LN2 in a lot of the writings, but the evidence seems to be strong that it works and its my favorite flavor, free. Feels like the pin test is sort of the sugar shake of hygienic testing, good enuff for most
I attached a printable template for those interested

I find the last quote very interesting as it shows a way for virus resistance, virus tolerance is a likely dead end do to the shifting landscape, but removal of the vectors is different ie mites in general, and specifically targeting those with high virus levels might stand the test of time.and it hold the hives virus levels back

This year I started walking the path this thread layed out
I got a F-2 off a VP queens (TF operation) II VSH Carniolan breeder, her mother (F-1) survived 2 winters TF in up state NY.. (this was a fall back/windfall that appeared after my supplier for a Purder MBB breeder went squirrely a few mouths after agreeing to sell me one when they were ready , blamed covid, and then more than doubled the agreed price.. so I walked)

I sold 75+ queens locally, did a queen rearing class for a local club, handed out a bunch of 48 hour cells as a beta test to try and generate local interest for next year.

The $$ from the queens payed to get me on plane last weekend and learn some new skills(It will be at least another year to pay for the new gear😝)
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Now I just need to talk Juhani in to sending me some germplasm 😁

This winter I am working with the same club to build equipment so that everyone has a nuc box or 2 and to use at there (curantly 4 hive) club apiary for queen rearing with the goal of getting the club to point were they are self sustainable and using club produced queens/cells/48 hour cells members that had a good year can make swarm control splits and sell to those who didn't have a good year, turning off the puppy mill genetics package treadmill and replacing it with selected, locally adapted gentinics and nucs.
small scale, yes but you got to proof of concept somewhere and small scale is better then not doing anything.

otherwise.. crap year, little crop, late spring killing frost to extreme drought to the point they just closed access to NFS lands do to fire danger (they can't fight any more)
 

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This year I started walking the path this thread layed out
...

I sold 75+ queens locally, did a queen rearing class for a local club, handed out a bunch of 48 hour cells as a beta test to try and generate local interest for next year.
...

This winter I am working with the same club to build equipment so that everyone has a nuc box or 2 and to use at there (curantly 4 hive) club apiary for queen rearing with the goal of getting the club to point were they are self sustainable and using club produced queens/cells/48 hour cells members that had a good year can make swarm control splits and sell to those who didn't have a good year, turning off the puppy mill genetics package treadmill and replacing it with selected, locally adapted gentinics and nucs.
small scale, yes but you got to proof of concept somewhere and small scale is better then not doing anything.
MSL:

Great post- I apologize for the delay in responding as I have been on the road for work.

I respect the fact that you developed a goal and proceeded to work the plan- I expect that your project might yield good benefits, both for your local club and also as a template for others to emulate.

Did you end up doing some I.I. this year with your own stock after learning the ropes?

I will sincerely look forward to how this initiative progresses for you- thank you for posting the update.

Russ
 

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Discussion Starter #827
I respect the fact that you developed a goal and proceeded to work the plan
I really wish that's what happened.
I was frustrated by what I saw as bad advice and faith based beekeeping and set out to chalegen it... As I worked to change other people to a local sustainable way of beekeeping, I found reason to change my ways, including buying better genetics

Did you end up doing some I.I. this year with your own stock after learning the ropes?
Class was this weeked, drought shut down my queen rearing, mid july grafts stopped taking so no.
 
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