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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Tomorrow I go to my first bee club meeting and will learn how to do a mite check
I missed the boat and have not done a mite check yet, bad I know.
I let fear of the bees get to me, as they were much more aggressive than the swarm I caught.
Turns out it was no big deal checking them.

I have Formic Pro coming Thursday. Here is my question, when I check on Thursday
(figure better to wait and check when I can apply the treatment at the same time and disturb the hive one less time)
If upon doing my mite check I find that the count is crazy high as I would presume it is, what would you say to my doing the double treatment, risk loosing the queen but plan on adding a mated queen.

Or would you think the better way to go would be a less aggressive approach (two single applications back to back) and not risk loosing the queen.
Not sure if this matters but they have a full ten deep full of honey and the lower deep has lots of nectar.
Please share your thoughts.
(Yes, I know I may most likely be buying new bees in the Spring :cry: so please you don't need to address that)
Look forward to hearing your thoughts
 

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So with the double treatment with FP, you are looking at a loss rate of about 11% (Randy Oliver), the single treatment done twice lowers that to about 5%. Queen losses with formic seem to do with pre-existing conditions in the hive, like a weak, old, or injured queen, or the temperature was far exceeded. The less aggressive approach appears to have around the same efficacy as the double treatment, so I would always go with that if they were my hives. Keep an eye on the temps though, the FP doesn't work very well below 50 degrees. Its okay if you get those temps at night, but daytime temps need to be above that.
 

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you going to the Finger Lakes Beekeepers Club for the meeting? I would wait and ask them what they recommend, many of them use the formic treatments. Note normally if your mite count is really high, one treatment won't get them low enough, but since the queens are shutting down you may luck out somewhat, but you may not have many winter bees.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
you going to the Finger Lakes Beekeepers Club for the meeting? I would wait and ask them what they recommend, many of them use the formic treatments.
yes, meeting with the Finger Lakes Club, we were supposed to meet last Thursday but got rained out.
 

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They do recommend 24-72 wait time after a full inspection. A mite wash probably is ok, but the point is that the less disturbance to the hive the better. You should learn how to do it,but given the circumstances and how late in the season it is, I would consider foregoing the wash and going ahead with treatment.
I have used formic for three years and attribute one queen loss to the treatment. Your odds are better with the cooler weather. I would decide on whether to do a 10 or 20 day treatment by how many bees I have in the hive. If they are light, I do the 20 day treatment.
It would be prudent to have a source for a mated queen if you need one so ask at your meeting. However, keep in mind that it could be 20 days or longer before you know if you need one. I say longer because the queen will often stop laying for awhile. Unless you spot her, you may think you are queenless. This has happened to me more than once. Good luck! J
https://nodglobal.com/frequently-asked-questions-formic-pro/
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
They do recommend 24-72 wait time after a full inspection. A mite wash probably is ok, but the point is that the less disturbance to the hive the better.
I don't understand, if less disturbance is better, than it seems like you would do the two together rather than wait 24-72 hours. What am I missing?



You should learn how to do it, but given the circumstances and how late in the season it is, I would consider foregoing the wash and going ahead with treatment.
I have used formic for three years and attribute one queen loss to the treatment. Your odds are better with the cooler weather. I would decide on whether to do a 10 or 20 day treatment by how many bees I have in the hive. If they are light, I do the 20 day treatment. [/url]
So how do I weigh to tell how heavy or light they are? Do I weigh both deeps even though the top looks to be mostly honey?

Good luck! J[/url]
Thank you
 

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In your other post, I had offered to help. I don't know if you saw it. How close to Canandaigua are you? I could swing by if you're reasonably close and do an oav treatment and see what what your mite load looks like, if you have a screen bottom board.
Are these Kim C's bees? If so she does a good job with her nucs and usually they are mite free.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I'm sorry I missed your offer to help. It looks like I am an hour and a half so probably too far. But it sure was nice of you to offer. I am sure the Bee Club will set me up with someone. I got my nuc from Allen Pond from Binghamton, They were mite free when I got them from him 3 months ago.
 

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the beeclub has an email system to talk to each other, you could ask for help.
 

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@theresalynn. Placing the formic pads creates little disturbance but pulling brood frames, shaking off nurse bees for a wash does. Thats why I suggested you consider just treating and foregoing the wash.
To determine if the hive is light or heavy with bees, simply look down the seams between the frames. Formic requires 6 frames of bees. If it is less, I go with the 2 treatment method. It is a judgment call. J
 

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Discussion Starter #12
All my mite testing stuff came today, I did a wash and had 7 mites. I put one package of formic pro (divides into two strips) across the center. I also pulled the entrance reducer and currently have it on a screened bottom. Daytime temps are to be in the mid 70's most of the next 10 days. l be moving it over to a solid bottom in the next month or so.

The top 10 deep must weigh close to 60 pounds, and according to one of the instructors yesterday, she said if the hive is too heavy to lift with three fingers you have a good weight. Well there was no way I was budging that hive with three fingers and I am a pretty strong gal. So over all I am pretty happy with the progress. I saw lots of capped brood and I read the Formic Acid will kill the mites under in capped brood. Here's hoping.
 
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