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I have two hives. One is a D.E. hive with passive ventilation that our mentor thinks we're sightly crazy to have, but he humours us. The D.E. hive has two deep brood boxes and a shallow honey super. The Langstroth has two deeps and two shallow honey supers, with a third shallow added this morning (under the two shallows.)

I got these bees in May (my mentor forced swarms into my hives) and they are doing really well. I have been bottom supering. Every box on the Langstroth started with drawn comb until this morning, when I added a shallow box of foundation under the two existing honey supers (one is ready for extraction, the other is getting there!)

Question #1: Should I have swapped a frame or two of honey/drawn comb from one of the full honey supers for the fresh foundation in the new super, to encourage the girls to get busy in the new "foundation" super? Of course, I read about this AFTER I added that third super. I don't know if I should go back and swap frames around.

Question #2: The D. E. hive started with all foundation (no drawn comb), so the girls have had a lot of work to do drawing out comb and are a bit behind the Langstroth hive. I checked their one honey super today and I think it's time to add another. They have drawn out 8 of the 11 frames (yes, 11 frames in a D.E.) and they're mostly filled with honey and I need to get another super on asap. I noticed that the frame on one end is not drawn out at all, and has a few holes chewed (by the bees) near the top of the foundation. Question is, what's the chewing about? Also, should I swap that un-drawn frame of foundation with a drawn one from the centre of that shallow?

Question #3: I started beekeeping last year. I have not yet been stung by my girls, despite going gloveless during inspections. (I do know I had no allergic reactions to stings in my pre-beekeeping life.) Is this unusual? I'm more than a little amazed. My husband has started calling me the Bee Whisperer. ;)

Clear as mud? If you're still reading, I thank you!

Natalie
 

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#1 You can "bait" a super using drawn comb. It may not be very helpful if the bee are busy "drying honey" elsewhere (or not storing nectar).

#2a Bees often chew foundation (and drawn comb) when there is no flow or flow begining to wane.

#2b Moving full frames to outside is always a good idea . . . but they may not fill ANY frame if there is no nectar.

#3a If you had a true "allergic" reaction once (rather than a "normal" reaction), what is your plan for the "next time" you get stung????

#3b You WILL get stung, just keep whispering :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
#3a If you had a true "allergic" reaction once (rather than a "normal" reaction), what is your plan for the "next time" you get stung????

#3b You WILL get stung, just keep whispering :)

Thanks for the good tips, Dave! I actually DIDN'T have any allergic reaction to previous stings (from honeybees not my own!), so I am hoping I remain "un-allergic."

I think I'll be glad when my own girls sting me and we get it over with! :)

Natalie
 

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Most stings a beekeeper gets is his/her fault, working to fast/mashing a lady or some other lack of detail. although sometimes a girl just snaps and goes postal.count your blessings,have fun and good luck.:thumbsup:
 
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