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1. If I see nectar coming in to any degree, can I pull the candy board and place a super? Brood boxes are 100% drawn and currently being used for brood and resources. Temps in the mid 60s to mid 70s during the day, high 40s to mid 50s at night. All hives I am considering this on have 3 frames honey in the top brood box.

2. If the queen is using both brood boxes, is there any reason to flip them? Noticed more capped brood in the top box and more eggs in the lower box. I flipped with the reasoning that the capped cells would be available sooner for the queen, drawing her lower. Maybe I should have just left it alone.

3. I placed a super on the hives that had more evidence of nectar coming in. Some of last years super frames had uncapped honey that did not shake out when I pulled them. The frames were stored in an unheated barn, protected from the elements and intruders, but definitely below freezing temps. The honey looked to be partially crystallized. Will the bees clean this out before storing new nectar? Or will they fill around it or over top of it? My fear is that they would leave it there, causing issues when extracting or tainting my 2021 honey.
 

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I'm in mid Missouri near I 70 so I may only be a week ahead of you. I use sugar blocks during the winter and I gave them blocks and pollen sub with sugar 2/22/21. I gave them sugar water 3/23/21 and they have been slow to take it.

I would consider removing all but one frame of honey in your brood box and replacing it with 2 frames of mediums that have some honey on them. When they have started to refill those you could move them back into your super and put the super on. Put the newly filled frames in the middle of the box and if you have drawn comb use that for the rest of the 8 or 10 frames in the super. If no drawn comb give them foundation or foundationless whichever you use. Last year I tried to extract some crystalized frames of honey in the spring with very little luck. But it didn't hurt or taint the honey that I did extract. My bees didn't touch last years honey after they started bring in nectar. I doubt if yours will. Those frames I ended up scraping out the comb.

Some people reverse the brood boxes some don't, your choice.

You are getting close to being in the flow.
 

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1. If I see nectar coming in to any degree, can I pull the candy board and place a super? Brood boxes are 100% drawn and currently being used for brood and resources. Temps in the mid 60s to mid 70s during the day, high 40s to mid 50s at night. All hives I am considering this on have 3 frames honey in the top brood box.

2. If the queen is using both brood boxes, is there any reason to flip them? Noticed more capped brood in the top box and more eggs in the lower box. I flipped with the reasoning that the capped cells would be available sooner for the queen, drawing her lower. Maybe I should have just left it alone.

3. I placed a super on the hives that had more evidence of nectar coming in. Some of last years super frames had uncapped honey that did not shake out when I pulled them. The frames were stored in an unheated barn, protected from the elements and intruders, but definitely below freezing temps. The honey looked to be partially crystallized. Will the bees clean this out before storing new nectar? Or will they fill around it or over top of it? My fear is that they would leave it there, causing issues when extracting or tainting my 2021 honey.
Reversing brood boxes is promoted by some as a swarm preventative. If your colony has three frames of honey, I would personally put them in the center of the lower brood box and stop feeding. Reversing is a tool but I almost never find it appropriate, especially when you have brood in both brood boxes.
 
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